Novel Coronavirus

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PilgrimsProgress

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CBC was reporting that Australia is having Covid problems. High rises locked down with no one allowed in or out. Tough times in Melbourne. Thinking of Pilgrim!!
Fortunately (at the moment) where I live in Sydney is not so adversely affected.......

Here is the link for those interested - More than 3,000 Melbourne public housing residents placed into 'hard lockdown'

I have long observed that there is a slight difference in the way Aussie governments view crisis. Individual freedom is not as highly prized as it is in most other western countries. New Zealand has a similar mentality. (Possibly because as two island countries in the southern oceans we see disease etc as coming from "over there".)
New Zealand went straight into lockdown -and we had a modified lockdown.

With opening up, Victoria has seen an increasing number of community acquired infections. As it's occurring in public big housing department buildings it is thought that it could easily spread. (Use of elevators, laundries, etc) -so it's now complete lockdown for those buildings.

We have been successful in preventing overseas infection in Sydney by having returning citizens placed under lockdown for two weeks in hotels -under the control of the military and police forces. Testing etc occurred under quarantine. By contrast many other countries had a policy of "self isolation" -which wasn't as affective.
 

ChemGal

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Fortunately (at the moment) where I live in Sydney is not so adversely affected.......

Here is the link for those interested - More than 3,000 Melbourne public housing residents placed into 'hard lockdown'

I have long observed that there is a slight difference in the way Aussie governments view crisis. Individual freedom is not as highly prized as it is in most other western countries. New Zealand has a similar mentality. (Possibly because as two island countries in the southern oceans we see disease etc as coming from "over there".)
New Zealand went straight into lockdown -and we had a modified lockdown.

With opening up, Victoria has seen an increasing number of community acquired infections. As it's occurring in public big housing department buildings it is thought that it could easily spread. (Use of elevators, laundries, etc) -so it's now complete lockdown for those buildings.

We have been successful in preventing overseas infection in Sydney by having returning citizens placed under lockdown for two weeks in hotels -under the control of the military and police forces. Testing etc occurred under quarantine. By contrast many other countries had a policy of "self isolation" -which wasn't as affective.
I'm glad it's ok where you are.
When it comes to travel I'm ok with quarantine. I'm ok with the self-quarantine and isolation (and enforcing it if not followed) when there has been an exposure or someone is showing symptoms of COVID.
I'm ok with restrictions on what can occur.
Not allowing people to leave under any circumstances? That's imprisonment and I think that's overreaching.
 

Waterfall

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Fortunately (at the moment) where I live in Sydney is not so adversely affected.......

Here is the link for those interested - More than 3,000 Melbourne public housing residents placed into 'hard lockdown'

I have long observed that there is a slight difference in the way Aussie governments view crisis. Individual freedom is not as highly prized as it is in most other western countries. New Zealand has a similar mentality. (Possibly because as two island countries in the southern oceans we see disease etc as coming from "over there".)
New Zealand went straight into lockdown -and we had a modified lockdown.

With opening up, Victoria has seen an increasing number of community acquired infections. As it's occurring in public big housing department buildings it is thought that it could easily spread. (Use of elevators, laundries, etc) -so it's now complete lockdown for those buildings.

We have been successful in preventing overseas infection in Sydney by having returning citizens placed under lockdown for two weeks in hotels -under the control of the military and police forces. Testing etc occurred under quarantine. By contrast many other countries had a policy of "self isolation" -which wasn't as affective.
Is it winter there Pilgrims? Does that have any bearing on the increase in numbers?
Glad your safe.
 
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For those of you who can appreciate my sense of humour right now, this is my covid 19 mask anthem.


(I'm having a harder time recognizing people who say hello sometimes.)
 

PilgrimsProgress

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Is it winter there Pilgrims? Does that have any bearing on the increase in numbers?
Glad your safe
Yep-it sure is Winter......
I froze at church today - as we are in a huge tent whilst the church is getting carpeting.....

Our flu numbers seem to be down this year- probably because we're more stringent about washing our hands etc. As for the coronavirus it may have some influence, as I know when I'm feeling the cold and indoors more I tend to get more viruses. Nothing like our Aussie sunshine and spending a lot of time outdoors! :giggle:
 

PilgrimsProgress

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When it comes to travel I'm ok with quarantine. I'm ok with the self-quarantine and isolation (and enforcing it if not followed) when there has been an exposure or someone is showing symptoms of COVID.
I'm ok with restrictions on what can occur.
Not allowing people to leave under any circumstances? That's imprisonment and I think that's overreaching.
The problem with self-isolation is that it doesn't work. In a pandemic situation I don't see it as imprisonment. Food, medicine, etc is brought to the people -and, if there is a medical need, this will be allowed for. For the sake of the common good in a pandemic and life threatening situation, folks can stay indoors for a short time. What cost is freedom? Freedom to give others an illness that could kill them?
 

Inannawhimsey

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The problem with self-isolation is that it doesn't work. In a pandemic situation I don't see it as imprisonment. Food, medicine, etc is brought to the people -and, if there is a medical need, this will be allowed for. For the sake of the common good in a pandemic and life threatening situation, folks can stay indoors for a short time. What cost is freedom? Freedom to give others an illness that could kill them?

Hearhear.

Indeed and the virus spreads the most indoors. Those poor people in the prisons and long term care homes and nursing homes. Those poor people in NYC who were nastily infected by the thousands of infected moved from hospitals into nursing homes.

(The global riots arent helping...I expect more sick...bizarre how many peeps originslly shoutibg out KEEP PHYSICAL DIATANCING were bending knee and supporting the rioting...I really wonder if we human beings actually have any free will at all...tisk)

All people need are masks and physical distancing and proper hand washing. Thats it. Just a teeny change to peoplez lives and then you dont have to shut down the global economy.

It is bad to tell people who test positive to go home. Then you get your family sick.

Also regarding Winter there: a blogger I follow has a farm in Tasmania and his water pipes r currwntly frozen lol

#MutualAid
#BeNotAfraid
#SystemicWhimsey
#JoyPrivilege
 

Inannawhimsey

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In other words
We the people can solve this
We dont NEED the government or rich corporations to save us

We can and have make our own masks
We can physical distance
We can wash our hands

I would guess there is some resistance to that among "elite"?

Screw you, Gates Foundation :3 You failed horribly with your GM mosquitos.

#MutualAid
#BeNotAfraid
#SystemicWhimsey
#JoyPrivilege
 

ChemGal

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The problem with self-isolation is that it doesn't work. In a pandemic situation I don't see it as imprisonment. Food, medicine, etc is brought to the people -and, if there is a medical need, this will be allowed for. For the sake of the common good in a pandemic and life threatening situation, folks can stay indoors for a short time. What cost is freedom? Freedom to give others an illness that could kill them?
If people haven't been exposed to the virus they cannot spread it. Food, medicine and medical attention is given to prisoners too. I think it's ridiculous to say people aren't allowed to go for a walk or something like that when it's unlikely they have the virus.

Why doesn't self-isolation work?
 

PilgrimsProgress

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Why doesn't self-isolation work?
Because it doesn't....... The reason why we introduced isolation in guarded hotels was because we initially tried "self-isolation" on folks returning from overseas.
Folks got off cruise ships/planes and took public transport home. As many returned to an empty pantry they had stop-overs in shops, chemists, newsagents, etc etc. (They didn't like to impose on family/friends/neighbours)

The result - the first wave of infection.....
Statistics show that Australia has handled the pandemic better than most countries - the statistics speak for themselves.
 

Waterfall

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Yep-it sure is Winter......
I froze at church today - as we are in a huge tent whilst the church is getting carpeting.....

Our flu numbers seem to be down this year- probably because we're more stringent about washing our hands etc. As for the coronavirus it may have some influence, as I know when I'm feeling the cold and indoors more I tend to get more viruses. Nothing like our Aussie sunshine and spending a lot of time outdoors! :giggle:
There's talk of a second wave happening here in the fall or whenever the regular flu season starts and the cold sets in. Some seem to think that COVID will rear its ugly head with a vengeance as the cold weather approaches and we hunker down in doors, probably based on the experience of the Spanish flu in 1918 which had 3 waves before it seemed to "disappear". I know our "regular" flu season vaccines and what strains to include in them are often based on countries like yours on the other half of the hemisphere who experience winter prior to us.....so whatever you will experience, flu wise, is watched carefully and flu vaccines here are adjusted accordingly.
It is interesting, as you noted in another post that countries do tend to have higher cases of COVID coming from within large buildings holding larger groups of people. (eg. retirement /nursing homes, meat factories, migrant workers housed in common buildings with bunkers for sleeping, apartment buildings, etc...) Now we're more outdoors here and numbers are declining with the odd surge coming from congested areas of people even without buildings, such as beaches and outdoor gatherings.
So I guess we should be listening closely to your first hand reports from Australia as your flu season begins.
 

Waterfall

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The problem with self-isolation is that it doesn't work. In a pandemic situation I don't see it as imprisonment. Food, medicine, etc is brought to the people -and, if there is a medical need, this will be allowed for. For the sake of the common good in a pandemic and life threatening situation, folks can stay indoors for a short time. What cost is freedom? Freedom to give others an illness that could kill them?
I've been reading that not all countries share that wonderful attitude "for the sake of the common good", and I tend to agree that it's a necessary trait for a population to survive this pandemic with less deaths.
Love the motto Australia is using, "Staying apart, Keeps us together"
 

Inannawhimsey

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I have concerns over policies though, I shall see what happens.
I've seen one person wearing a face shield so far.

Hopefully things will get better and we don't see too much worsening first.
Can you give me an example of what policies you have concerns with?

I have seen 3 people with face shields so far. One of them was deaf so had a fun convo with her :3

I don't know how things r in Canada but there are multiple outbreaks in US right now. Much confusion as why it seems death has gone down but infection #'s seem to have risen.

#MutualAid
#BeNotAfraid
#SystemicWhimsey
#JoyPrivilege
 

KayTheCurler

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The only reason I can think of for self isolation to fail is a lack of effort. My daughter quarantined three times without difficulty.
 

unsafe

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Don't know if this has made it on this sight ----But this shows just how crazy this world is becoming ------HOW Irresponsible can we humans get -----how crazy can we act -----this is just Nuts ------Not much wonder why God wants to destroy this earth and create a New One ------how arrogant and Satanic thinking is this -----Satan is having a hay day in this world right now ----

Alabama students throwing 'Covid parties'

Students in Tuscaloosa Alabama are being accused of throwing parties to intentionally catch the coronavirus. A member of the local city council says the organizers of the parties are purposely inviting guests who have the virus, and giving money to the first person to contract the virus.

 
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I'm not exactly surprised that a bunch of teenagers would do that. I'm surprised a house party is international news. But I guess the story helps to warn other places in case the trend spreads - as they can do so quickly with social media..
 

ChemGal

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Because it doesn't....... The reason why we introduced isolation in guarded hotels was because we initially tried "self-isolation" on folks returning from overseas.
Folks got off cruise ships/planes and took public transport home. As many returned to an empty pantry they had stop-overs in shops, chemists, newsagents, etc etc. (They didn't like to impose on family/friends/neighbours)

The result - the first wave of infection.....
Statistics show that Australia has handled the pandemic better than most countries - the statistics speak for themselves.
That's people not doing it not that it doesn't work. People coming into the country is also very different from people who never left. Leaving the country was a choice and the quarantine period for coming back in is limited.
 

ChemGal

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Ah, if people don't do it -it doesn't work......
Reality is what one has to respond to, surely?
I don't understand the whole not everyone who should isn't so let's get everyone to do it long-term. Shutting down high risk activities makes sense to me. Not allowing people to go for a walk, or to pick up groceries, or to do deliveries for necessities for others if they have no reason to suspect an exposure doesn't.
 
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