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Living with disability

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KayTheCurler

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Architects - continued from above. Our community got a spanking new Pre K to Grade 3 school. The'logical' entrance is on the far side of the parking lot. When this was pointed out to the authorities they replied that the children would have a sidewalk to go on (around two sides of the lot instead of heading directly to the door). The entrance for deliveries has a kerb instead of a ramp. There was no specified space for the Janitorial staff to store their equipment.
 

ChemGal

One with keen eye
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Flooring can be tough, as it varies with footwear. There was a temporary pedestrian tunnel thing for construction, wood was put down. Totally fine with runners, but in the winter if I was wearing boots it was awful. I've noticed similar issues with indoor flooring, some is fine with heels but flip flops will totally slide on it and then vice versa for others.

The one that surprises me is those kids play places. Multiple ones have the hard, smooth floors, only the play areas are padded. They don't allow shoes to be worn. I think it's waaaay worse than a pool, and there aren't rules like no-running (and try to stop a toddler as they go from one play area to another from running). I find it worrying, especially with all of those carrying babies and running after little ones.
 

Mrs.Anteater

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They are building a new hospice. Every room will have its own patio. Some rooms are supposed to have wider beds, so couples can sleep together. But - all doors will be narrow like in a regular house- meaning you can’t move a patient from one room into another or out on the patio in their bed, even if the bed is regular size.
 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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It really points to the strong need for consultation with end users of all sorts - sometimes this happens, sometimes not.
 

Mrs.Anteater

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It really points to the strong need for consultation with end users of all sorts - sometimes this happens, sometimes not.
Yup, and consultation with OTs who are used to be client centred. We did contact other hospices with questions about what went well and what would they make better and forwarded the results. ( we weren’t ask to do that). Never heard from it again. There were also a lot of open questions we asked to be considered. I wonder how much of it was an architect who wasn’t told specific needs. It will certainly look nice.
 

Inannawhimsey

M&M, Cascadian Lovers
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I don't have the stats, but from my own observances I can imagine some of the problems people face when living with disability.

Many of them seem to live in poverty - a large percentage of the people who come to the church where I volunteer have health problems severe enough that they are unable to work.
At the same time their expenses may be higher
They may need aids for mobility, for reaching, for personal care (a friend with Parkinsons has support bars installed all around his home so he can reach from one to another to get from the bed to the bathroom, livingroom, kitchen)
They may need a personal attendant for a few hours or full time
Buildings that should be accessible are not always so - ramps are poorly designed or placed, or not cleaned off after storms. Doors are hard to open. Elevators are not always available. Not enough bathrooms have hand rails to assist with support. (I ran into this problem at our newly built Y when a woman in a wheelchair reprimanded me for using the only handicapped shower stall.)
They may need a three-wheeled bicycle for recreation or transportation

There are probably ways that other people can be sensitive to their needs, comfort, and happiness - like talking to them directly rather than to their companion (this happens with old people too); or sitting down to talk to a person in a wheelchair so that she doesn't have to look up all the time. Being patient when they require a little extra time. Holding doors. Including them in conversations, inviting them to events, offering transportation, carrying a bowl of soup (a big help to me at church luncheons). Asking their opinion. Asking for their help. (A blind man has recently taken over one of the positions on our church council.)

This is a thread for people to share what it is like to live with disability and how others can help - including advocacy. (My church is pushing for better public transportation in this city - perhaps because one person living with a disability keeps bringing it to our attention.)
Hallo Seeler

What a DELIGHTFUL thread

Well as a multidisabled critter, here is some advice:

--I stutter. Not as bad as some, not as fluent as others. If you want to be an ally, watch a Fish Called Wanda. Be sure to finish my sentences. Stutter at me. Make faces. That will go over swell.

--I also have a mental illness. If you want to be my ally, offer to help me with suicide, I prefer long walks off short piers and am afraid of sea anenomies.

--I also am nonneurotypical. If you want to be my ally, laugh at my scattered thoughts, be sure to lace in R words and Dumb. When I become the ruler of the world, I will remember that with fondness.

--I have camel toes. Now if they are bleeding, please do the sniff test and wrinkle yer nose. They are built for desert travel.

--I unfortunately have no sense of humour. There is no cure for that. I am sorry. Tch. How Canadian.

--I am morbidly obese. If you want 2 be my ally, shout Minke!!! at native Japanese or Icelanders. Or poke me with a harpoon.

--I have a learning disability. If you want to be my ally, OH A SQUIRREL!!!

--More seriously: like all disabled, I am unique and sometimes, the best thìng you can do is get out of my way lol. I am an individual and not part of a group. Stereotypes serve a purpose. Get to know me first. I wont bite. Unless you want me to *waggles eyebrows*

I hope that helps clear up things.

#MutualAid
#BeNotAfraid
#SystemicWhimsey
#JoyPrivilege
 

Luce NDs

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Stereotypes are a version of chiral creations especially adapted to life in essential oils whether olive, soy, etc. Corn oil is not good ... dextromania ... it may cause laughter and you will falloff or split ... life is cracked like that!
 
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It's been awhile since this thread was engaged.

I went to the physio this morning. A new one because my old one was booked solid for awhile. She used the ultrasound machine on my lower right and hip area (I've had gradually more tightness and pain on the right side since I broke my right knee - I'm slightly out of pelvic alignment moving slightly differently - my right leg is mechanically a tiny bit shorter now than before but that's postural, because I lean to the side more and there's more curvature of my back on that side) and at first I didn't notice much difference, except she massaged the area with the ultrasound wand, which felt good. Now I feel so much better. It's incredible! I highly recommend it for anyone with back pain (or perhaps other muscle and joint pain and or sciatica. It really did wonders better than any pill I've tried. I don't know how long it lasts. The last physio (my semi regular one) just gives me stretching excercises. They help too, of course - but this was a lot of rapid relief!
 
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It's not just masking the pain. I feel no tension-pain. It released it. She knew exactly where the problem was and what spots to hit without me explaining where every one was (because the sore spots sort of radiate together - but she knew exactly where they were originating.)Smart physiotherapist.
 

ChemGal

One with keen eye
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I've had physiotherapist use US before on me, but there were multiple treatments and US wasn't the thing that typically changed from one appointment to another so really couldn't say how much it really helped me.

No difference in anything with the imaging US besides some sore spots from where they had to press harder to see what they needed to get at :LOL:
 
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I've tried a few things including the needling where the muscle contracts and releases around the needle. Two of three of those appointments were so uncomfortable and painful, I discontinued. This ultrasound worked today, anyway.
 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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Great to hear you found some relief today Kimmio! A knowledgeable and experienced physio is a good person to have in your pain management team for sure. Now keep up your gentle stretching ....
 
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I'm stiff again today. Yesterday was a bad day filled with tension for other reasons - so I'm tense all over, which I think is an expected reaction to a really stressful day. I will be getting the ultrasound again though. I found it really helpful and maybe ongoing treatments will bring more lasting results.
 

ninj

I just am
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I'm stiff again today. Yesterday was a bad day filled with tension for other reasons - so I'm tense all over, which I think is an expected reaction to a really stressful day. I will be getting the ultrasound again though. I found it really helpful and maybe ongoing treatments will bring more lasting results.
It's great the ultrasound is working for you!

Even though you can only catch it on cbc Gem, "You Can't Ask That" is an awesome show. People with disabilities answer awkward or really stupid questions that the public emailed to them. Each show involves people with various disabilities -- one type each episode --Wheelchair users, Autism, Down Syndrome, Limb differences, Bipolar etc. Very informative and interesting, often funny.
 
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It's great the ultrasound is working for you!

Even though you can only catch it on cbc Gem, "You Can't Ask That" is an awesome show. People with disabilities answer awkward or really stupid questions that the public emailed to them. Each show involves people with various disabilities -- one type each episode --Wheelchair users, Autism, Down Syndrome, Limb differences, Bipolar etc. Very informative and interesting, often funny.
I saw it. It was a good series.
 

KayTheCurler

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Glad the ultraasound treatment helps you - even if it isn't perfect with one treatment. Many years ago I had ultrasound for an injury and a TENS unit was used at home. Helpful. I can't remember if you have mentioned TENS.
 

BetteTheRed

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I had a lot of luck with a DCM, who used accupuncture (sometimes hooked up to a TENS machine), cupping, and back scraping (as well as a cup of special herbal tea and a pile of funny little pills to take). Combo was very nice, and seemed to have something of a cumulative effect.
 
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