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Living with disability

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Carolla

wondering & wandering
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I'm glad this gent was responsive to helping you gain access as you requested.

So it seems at one level you agree with him Kimmio - that scooters are not necessarily 'needed' by all who purchase them. They are available for purchase by anyone. Is it possible he did not know this? How would the general public even know about this? It seems plausible (IMO) that this comment came from a place of not knowing. Possibly a response might have been to say something like "oh scooters are available for purchase by anyone who wants one - it's not necessary to prove need of one, unless one is applying for a subsidized purchase. Kind of like buying a car - no need to prove you need one." And just left it at that - correct info provided.
 
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Why doesn't he ask himself that instead of assuming that scooter users are somehow cheating? Because he's prejudiced about people with disabilities, that's why. His first thought is to try to judge who has a disability worthy of a "chair" or not. Even asking why I use a "chair"...none of his business. He can't realize that some are episodic, even day to day, hour to hour, either. It's for safety going outside because I can walk, in my case. I'm a high fall risk. Scooters require one to be able to get in and out - they're made for that. And something can be both helpful and fun. Until it happens to him someday, I suppose he won't get it.

People have this attitude that because you can stand and walk on a wobbly set of legs, you must. Even if it hurts, takes an inordinate amount of energy, or is more dangerous. ...That's why God invented mobility aides.

It's this narrow minded fking city. I never encountered that or did it ever cross my mind in Vancouver, that anyone using a scooter might not need it (whether they need it or want it I didn't differentiate).
 
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And my point about moving the queue was that it was not wide enough - very easy to move ropes attached to portable posts, or just have posts as markers and undo/ take out the ropes so it is possible to find another way in and out if necessary, without having to stop and ask anybody - and it didn't even really need to be there at all. That needs to become common sense - then fewer will complain about "those people" using scooters and wheelchairs being inconvenient - and the less they will make ignorant judgments about who "needs" one. Because everybody will have better access.
 
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Mendalla

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then fewer will complain about "those people" using scooters and wheelchairs being inconvenient - and the less they will make ignorant judgments about who "needs" one. Because everybody will have better access.

It would be nice if people would see things like this as a learning opportunity rather than an inconvenience. I have talked before about what happened when the Unitarian fellowship had an interim minister who used a scooter (CP, I think). They had done a lot already back before I joined (wheelchair ramps on both sides of the podium that held the lectern, accessible front door with a ramp and automatic door-openers). But we got a few lessons nonetheless. A member built a new lectern that could accommodate a scooter (she took it with her when she left as it was portable). An alarm panel was put at the accessible door (previously you had to come in through an inaccessible side door to turn off the alarm if you were opening). Probably some others I have forgotten since it has been a while now. IOW, instead of complaining, people need to be learning. That's my rant for today.
 

BetteTheRed

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Our podium is not accessible. Three steps, albeit with a sturdy railing. One day we're going to have to deal with it. We do have an automatic door, and our bathroom doors and stall doors are wide enough to accommodate a member with a big wheelchair.
 
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Same Tim's...the queue seemed a bit wider today (I did mention it to the clerk before).

I went to the little seating area off to the side of the supermarket, and there were two gentleman there. An elderly gentlemen and an attendant of some sort, about my age or a bit older. They were having jovial conversation. Behind them in the aisle were a couple of chairs. I stopped and the younger one got up and said, "You want me to move those or are you going to go for it?"...at the same time I said, "I'm thinking maybe I should just push them away with my scooter." He said, "That would be fun! Get all your frustrations out. Get Out of My Way!" We both laughed and he moved the chairs. He got it. That was a good moment.
 
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I started by reading a good article that begins on Page 7. But the whole magazine, about what disability advocates do in this province, is worth a look.

 

Luce NDs

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We are all disabled according to politicized powers ... thus the corruption of politics ... is it unreal for a person to be outside such circles and Sir Cuss?

Are large corporations political when it comes to the pragmatic diplomacy? They don't seem to wish to dip that far ... I find this disabling and lead us to the question about "our" being the worst enemy:

 

Luce NDs

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Doesn't seem to be all for the good in the statements of Dog Girl ... that nagging poesy!
 

KayTheCurler

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Kimmio - your post about using your scooter in a store reminded me of some fun my brother and his friends had with their local grocery store. My brother was unfortunate to become severely handicapped following a brain hemorrhage. He referred to himself as handicapped, not disabled, as he claimed he was 'able' to do many things. In his view everyone has some sort of handicap so that word suited him better. Over the course of years he became friends with quite a few other people in the area who had specific difficulties requiring canes, walkers, scooters etc. They lived in a densely populated area of London (UK) and he and his mates shared accessibility problems and solutions.

There was ONE grocery store that was easy to get to in the immediate area so they all shopped there. Itwas also convenient for their mobility aids. An upgrade was planned and started. It included an enclosed lane with bends in it to get to the till. My brother saw that this was going to be a solid installation with the uprights fastened into floor with sturdy fencing between the posts. He found the Manager and politely asked if he had thought about access for wheelchair and scooter users. The Manager said "It'll be fine. We paid a fully trained architect to plan our renovations". Other wheelchair and scooter users also voiced their concerns, with the Manager getting increasingly annoyed.

Special activities were planned for an official opening day. The people in the 'Wheeled Brigade' came up with their own action plan. Local TV would be in attendance so the group approached them with their idea. The TV people were totally in favour.

Came the big day and the plan was underway. Among the shoppers entering the store was a very large man using a scooter. He picked up some shopping, proceeded to the checkout and got firmly stuck between two of the posts at the first 'bend'! The cameras recorded it all - including the angry Manager and staff yelling at the man to back up and get out of there. Eventually the queue area had to be dismantled to get the scooter out.

The TV station later used the event for a programme about accessibility for all.

Affirmative Action Works.
 
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I used to be called handicapped. The word changed while I was a young adult...it was deliberately to challenge the medical model and suggest that most of the disabling happens external to the person (store aisles being just one small issue of a number of cumulative physical and systemic barriers.) The word handicapped still works for that, too, though.
 

Luce NDs

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Can you imagine being stumped and enraged by a few restrictive posts? People should know beta the manna 've M'N ... acting like gods of war and all red in the face of it!
 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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Well yes, architects. Not all created equal! In the mid 1980s my hospital had a huge addition & new entrance. OT manager reviewed the plans - ZERO covered accesssible parking spaces!! She created a stink about that & things got changed. More recent reno to the main lobby - beautiful new white tile floors - shiney - and SLIPPERY - and not friendly to those with visual issues or dementia!! Whole floor had to be torn up & replaced. Patient bathrooms in a new wing had 'accessible' showers - except they weren't accessible & created tripping hazard for both staff & patients - - ripped out & replaced. So yes ... architects! Great at some stuff, not so good at other bits.
 

Carolla

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On a much sadder noted, my community is dealing with a hit & run fatality over the weekend of a disabled woman who was driving her power wheelchair in the bike lane of a major road (as she often did) before dawn - ie still dark. Tragic loss of someone well known in our community. The driver was later apprehended & charged. All very sad. Pedestrian & cyclist deaths are on a huge increase around here, but this is the first that I have heard of involving a person with mobility device.
 
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Can you imagine being stumped and enraged by a few restrictive posts? People should know beta the manna 've M'N ... acting like gods of war and all red in the face of it!
I wasn't enraged. But, annoyed, yes. It's encountering various different barriers to living with a disability - because of general ignorance - day after day after day, that can get really frustrating.
 
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Well yes, architects. Not all created equal! In the mid 1980s my hospital had a huge addition & new entrance. OT manager reviewed the plans - ZERO covered accesssible parking spaces!! She created a stink about that & things got changed. More recent reno to the main lobby - beautiful new white tile floors - shiney - and SLIPPERY - and not friendly to those with visual issues or dementia!! Whole floor had to be torn up & replaced. Patient bathrooms in a new wing had 'accessible' showers - except they weren't accessible & created tripping hazard for both staff & patients - - ripped out & replaced. So yes ... architects! Great at some stuff, not so good at other bits.
I noticed the floors on the new buses are slippery - my front wheels skid and its harder to back into the courtesy space.
 

BetteTheRed

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On a much sadder noted, my community is dealing with a hit & run fatality over the weekend of a disabled woman who was driving her power wheelchair in the bike lane of a major road (as she often did) before dawn - ie still dark. Tragic loss of someone well known in our community. The driver was later apprehended & charged. All very sad. Pedestrian & cyclist deaths are on a huge increase around here, but this is the first that I have heard of involving a person with mobility device.

I am not blaming non-drivers here, but I do wish that there were visibility rules around unlicensed locomotion. Lights, reflectors, etc.
 

Mendalla

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I am not blaming non-drivers here, but I do wish that there were visibility rules around unlicensed locomotion. Lights, reflectors, etc.

Bikes are required to have some minimum amount of lighting and there is a fine for non-compliance. They could easily do the same for these vehicles.

From the MoT guide to safe cycling:

The law requires that you equip your bike with:

A bell or horn in good working order
A white front light and a red rear light or
reflector if you ride between
1/2 hour before
sunset and
1/2 hour after sunrise
White reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks
 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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I am not blaming non-drivers here, but I do wish that there were visibility rules around unlicensed locomotion. Lights, reflectors, etc.
And on ALL our outwear clothing too!! It's not hard to do if anyone had the will to insist.
 
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