what are you reading?

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BetteTheRed

Resident Heretic
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I liked In the Skin of the Lion, but I confess it made a lot more sense when read it through for a second time. He's fond of a certain time and character fluidity from chapter to chapter that I sometimes find a little confusing to follow.
 

JayneWonders

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@BetteTheRed , I read the review by a friend, who said that she would have been better off reading it in large chunks, rather than picking it up and putting it down. I can see that, as the time and character shifts were confusing at times.
 

Mendalla

Agnostic pan(en)theist gorilla
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That's Ondaatje for you, though. The English Patient is nowhere near as simple and linear as the movie would have you believe. It's a good movie and I quite enjoyed it, but you're definitely getting something quite different from the novel there.
 

BetteTheRed

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I'm not generally a fan of movies from books, but that scene where the Sikh bomb defuser lets down his hair to bathe while the nurse watches has got to rank among the most erotic of anything I've ever seen.
 

Luce NDs

Well-Known Member
Eros in a tome ... that is incredible to read into such a state as the author may have gotten themselves into in chaotic manna of speak in in writ form!

Forms on the wall of a closed domain ... the form many texts take according to Plato ... on the flat out domain as a degree of mag nit eUde ... and expect some awe-NG!

When blinded by passion the thinking beauty may depart ... but as Skeeter Davis sang; "Its Not The End of the World" something may come on the return ... thus life goes on! And the participants make be inclusive internal parts of the new darkness ... thus relearning from a varied view!

Some say very few do the recall thing as they were gilt ridden about messing around with alternates to their owed (aulde in some tongue) self! Like translation of tome to tomb as transcendent meditation while into the alternate state ... helically ramped up? Transliteration personified as metamorphosis ... knowing ecstasy from butterflies ... it being said that butterflies have no formal brain ... being fey! Expect small flits ... that also has a metaphoric range ...
 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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I'm reading a lighter book at the moment - "Unravelling Canada" by Sylvia Olsen. In 2015 she & her husband made a cross Canada road trip (6 weeks) with many stops along the way to do knitting workshops & storytelling. It's an easy read. She is an interesting person - has a PhD in history; was married when a teenager (17 I think!) to a First Nations person & went to live on reserve on Vancouver Island for many years, immersed in Indigenous culture. Learned to knit & love Cowichan sweaters from her mother-in-law, and these sweaters along with some specific knitting techniques are the focus of this trip. Woven through it are interesting segments of Canadian history & Indigenous issues. It reminds me of Chop Suey Nation which I read last year - similar concept, different subject.
 

JayneWonders

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I've started to read "The Colony of Unrequited Dreams"


I'm not normally into historical novels; however, it is on my list of must read Canadian novels, so am going to set aside a day and "get into it"
 

Northwind

Still knitting. Walking the path to health.
I've started to read "The Colony of Unrequited Dreams"


I'm not normally into historical novels; however, it is on my list of must read Canadian novels, so am going to set aside a day and "get into it"

I loved this book. His other books are excellent as well. Custodian of Paradise and First Snow Last Light continue the story of characters in Colony.
 

JayneWonders

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ps. didn't realize how big it was. By accident, i had got the 3rd instead of the first in the series, so now have all 3 sitting at our house, and they are all fairly large!
 

Mrs.Anteater

Just keep going....
I am 400 pages into Obama’s book. About 1000 more to go but my ebook loan is only 4 more days...
I wish I had more background knowledge of American politics at that time. It does give a good insight and it’s very well written. Can only recommend it. He seems very smart and very approachable. Lots of stories from inside the White House. Kimmio would enjoy it. He reflects about why he was ‘t more radical. Really shows the human side of him.
 

Nancy

Well-Known Member
I just finished reading David Giuliano's book: "The Undertaking of Billy Buffone" for our sisters' book club tomorrow. Since my sister knows David, (her son is David's son-in-law), we considered inviting the author to the book club as well! But, we didn't get our act in gear soon enough for that. When I started to read the book, it reminded me of some of the sad/horrific things I became aware of as a Special Ed Teacher, and then a teacher at a challenging school. It brought back some horrific memories. However, the book is a difficult story told with genuine love and caring, and a dose of humour.
 

BetteTheRed

Resident Heretic
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So, I'm still wading through this year's Canada Reads selections. Finally finished "Hench" yesterday.

My opinions so far:

Johnny Appleseed, which won, apparently, excellent read. Indigenous gay guy in urban (not Toronto) environment.
Hench, by Natalie, dystopia, also a great read, does some explorations into post-CRISPR type "enhancements, very LGTBQ2S-ish flexible.
The Honey one, about twins separated in early adulthood, Nigerian, well, interesting, and I now own it, so will presumably finish it Very internal, largely rooted in many years of unsent letters.
The Polk book, which I'm farthest into of the remaining, adult Harry Potterish, like a lot, likely to finish, maybe not this borrowing...
The one about the mountains of Taiwan, which is lyrical, but kinda slow, least likely to finish.
 

Nancy

Well-Known Member
I can't say I enjoyed 'Johnny Appleseed', but I'm glad I read it. I just finished a historical fiction called 'The Rose Code' about three very different young girls who worked at the top-secret code-breaking Bletchley Park. Since this aspect of history was new to me, I thoroughly enjoyed learning about it in story format.
 

JayneWonders

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I returned the series by Wayne Johnston to the library. Just was not into reading. Will try again this winter. They come with recommendations by Northwind, so want to give them a fair chance.

I picked up this book, and really enjoyed the start of it, but, it is a slog right now. When I said that I was reading it a friend commented about how it was a long read, I now see why and agree with her. I wonder if it needed more aggressive editing to keep focusing. The writer did say that there was way more material than she could use.
The Light of Days: The Untold Story of Women Resistance Fighters in Hitler's Ghettos
by Judy Batalion


Then, a book that I had also requested was made available to me. I started it and have not been able to put it down.
I had a delightful, but, enforced break from reading with the stay of our granddaughters, or it likely would have been finished in 24 hrs. What a fabulous good read. Enlightening about a culture from the inside, and the power dynamics of family, and makes me consider what i presume, as well as generational trauma and influence.

A Woman Is No Man by Etaf Rum
 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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I have two books one the go at the moment, well three actually ... and I'm not someone who usually reads a lot!

Two related to my new hobby of 'birding' -
"A Siege of Bitterns" a birder murder mystery written by Steve Burrows who lives in Oshawa ON. First in the series, where the main character is a police detective (Canadian) now posted in Norfolk England. Interesting how it's all woven together.
"The Bird Way" - A New look at how birds talk, work, play, parent and think. by Jennifer Ackerman - non-fiction, well written, but slower going for me. So interesting to learn about birds from around the world, the new science and behavioural research of their habits.

And one 'church' related - new release by Alan Roxburgh - "Joining God in the Great Unraveling" - Where We Are and What I've Learned. Roxburgh's work and perspectives resonate for me, in terms of church being in the neighbourhood. So I'm just taking this one slowly, lots of reflection.
 

Mendalla

Agnostic pan(en)theist gorilla
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Having another of my "WTF do I really feel like reading" periods. However, I am now getting caught up on the comp entries on Stories Space since I usually won't read other entries until my own is in.

I read 'Where the Crawdads Sing'
Totally enjoyed it. Didn't want to put it down.
Does a good job of flipping back and forth in time, great character development, beautiful prose

So I first heard of this from the PBS Digital program It's Lit. Lindsay Ellis, an American s-f writer and literary blogger who is one of two hosts, poked fun at the title several times on an episode. Forget why it came up, but it may have been one she did on "how to have a bestseller" (her first novel was, as was Crawdads).
 
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