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Lastpointe

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Great photos. They are very majestic birds. Scavengers basically, like really big gulls but i have a fascination for them too


our local heron seems to have departed for Florida. Hubby is glad for the sake of his trout in the pond. My plastic alligators never scared him away this year

i don’t hear the frogs anymore and haven’t seen our turtles so I guess everyone is hunkering down for the cold

sadly that also means our house mice have returned. Ravaging anything I forget to put away At night. Traps are down but so far they are persistent
 

ChemGal

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I think we need some sort of read out panel on our arm or somewhere equally accessible. It could tell us when we should keep going, and when we should quit, what symptom means get to the doctor, and when it can safely be ignored etc.. Glad your knee pain improved.
There's actually a fair bit of interesting work being done for diabetes like that. If there's a bradykinin level indicator via a tattoo, I'm there!
 

ChemGal

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Had some communication issues between us which turned out for the better. Chemguy mentioned he wanted to make pot roast earlier in the week and took out the meat to defrost it. He knows that I dislike prime rib (what my parents always made as roast beef) and we often get what Chemguy refers to as pot roast from Costco to make stew in the slower cooker. So I was expecting stew in the oven. When he had pulled out the carrots he started asking me questions and I was like uh oh, this sounds like prime rib. So I got him to agree to make yorkshire pudding. Never made it, my mom always wanted us out of the kitchen when she was doing it.

Looked up a recipe, then another, didn't think the silicon muffin tins would do so great with heating oil in the oven and then pouring cold batter in. I'm in a Buy Nothing project group (look it up if interested) plus I knew a few people in there who I figured would have muffin tins if they were free. He said something about no more than 100 m away, so I messaged a neighbour instead - yep.

I ended up with good roast beef (no idea of the cut) and delicious yorkshire puddings which I think are actually better than my mom's as I recall hers were often quite black on the parts that touched the muffin tins. These were nice and golden. Only failure was lack of beef drippings for the gravy and yorkshire pudding (we just used vegetable oil) as it was a lean cut of meat and everything soaked into the potatoes and carrots - not necessarily a bad thing.

I was always told you can't have yorkshire pudding without some type of beef drippings. May be a dangerous thing to know otherwise ...
 
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Holy **** a car just sped through a stop sign and almost hit me. He saw me. What the? I didn't get a good look at the car, or the driver or the plate - it was just a pretty non descript sporty black car.

(Add: looked like a male, white male I think, with brown hair. That's all I saw. Now, as I sit near a parking lot nearby - found a restroom - I can count a number of cars that "could be" that one, or could be none of them, unfortunately.)
 
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BetteTheRed

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Actually, bacon drippings work every bit as well. Mom always kept a can of bacon fat in the fridge (we ate a fair bit of bacon, and she used the drippings all the time; we ate a bad amount of "fried bread"), and that was what she used for Yorkshire (she always made an eye of round roast with no fat).

I've used silicon muffin tins quite successfully. I actually have a specific silicone "popover" tin which is a little narrower and taller, which makes makes a very attractive yorkshire.

Another trick of the trade is to let the batter "relax" for 1/2-1 hr before pouring into heated, well greased container. Mom used to put the roast in, peel the potatoes for the roasted potatoes, and get them on to parboil, then make the yorkshire batter in the blender and let it sit covered until she took the roast out of the oven. (Let's not talk about how awful this roast now is, having been cooked at 350 degrees for some 2 1/2 hours until it is grey all the way through, but there's some nice charring on the outside to make a decent gravy, and she's kept the potato water). I lived for yorkshire and gravy, not so much the meat, at Sunday dinner.
 

Lastpointe

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If your parents bought prime rib for a regular roast they were splurging. Pricey cut even in the old days

but how nice you had Yorkshire puddings. We called them popovers as a kid and Yorkshire puddings as a big pot that you cut ip

however it’s really loveky

reminds me that next visit with kids must cook a roast and make popovers.
short story. We were a family of six. Everyone got two popovers. My sister married. First dinner my dad tried to give my brother in law two. We three siblings were quick to point out that sis needed to share her two. Not get extras.
 
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When I was a kid and my parents were together we usually had some kind of roast on Sunday. Often roast beef. My mom makes the kind of Yorkshire in a pan and/ or muffin tins if there's a bit of batter left over for a few. One or the other both, we called it Yorkshire pudding. Friends called the popovers and maybe I did as a kid. Don't remember.

(Man, I stopped to calm down and distract myself but my bladder is now triggered. Gotta go!)
 

KayTheCurler

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Sorry you almost met a lousy driver Kimmio. Pleased he didn't actually hit you.

My dad loved trotting out his Yorkshire pudding story. His parents were cotton mill workers and had seven kids - money was in short supply. Dad claimed that the only meat that was bought was a cheap roast and some bacon. Whatever the Sunday roast was it was served with potatoes, veggies, Yorkshire pudding (in the bottom of the roasting pan after the meat and spuds were removed), plus gravy. The plates were loaded and served - Yorkshire pudding. If anyone was still hungry they were served Yorkshire pudding and gravy. The next course was Yorkshire pudding, potatoes and gravy. Still hungry?? Have some Yorkshire pudding, gravy, spuds and whatever vegetable was available (Usually carrots, cabbage or turnips). The kids rarely got to have the meat which was made into sandwich filling, Shepherd's pie, stew etc during the week. Not surprisingly several of the kids grew up quite unhealthy - dad had bowed legs from rickets.
 

KayTheCurler

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I don't know the name of the mill - I don't recall ever asking. So many things I wish I'd asked about the older generations! I know my dad's grandfather made millworkers clogs because I have the pair he made for my dad. Just like these (I think they were always black) but il_794xN.2111495366_b4fb.jpgsized for a two or three year old. I also have a button hook but it belonged to my mother's mum.
 

ChemGal

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Actually, bacon drippings work every bit as well. Mom always kept a can of bacon fat in the fridge (we ate a fair bit of bacon, and she used the drippings all the time; we ate a bad amount of "fried bread"), and that was what she used for Yorkshire (she always made an eye of round roast with no fat).

I've used silicon muffin tins quite successfully. I actually have a specific silicone "popover" tin which is a little narrower and taller, which makes makes a very attractive yorkshire.

Another trick of the trade is to let the batter "relax" for 1/2-1 hr before pouring into heated, well greased container. Mom used to put the roast in, peel the potatoes for the roasted potatoes, and get them on to parboil, then make the yorkshire batter in the blender and let it sit covered until she took the roast out of the oven. (Let's not talk about how awful this roast now is, having been cooked at 350 degrees for some 2 1/2 hours until it is grey all the way through, but there's some nice charring on the outside to make a decent gravy, and she's kept the potato water). I lived for yorkshire and gravy, not so much the meat, at Sunday dinner.
I guess maybe I should have just asked here! I just figured hot metal tray isn't going to be the same as hot silicone, even though the oil would be hot.
We did have the batter sit for a while, went with Gordon Ramsey's recipe, although we had skim milk, not whole and I tend to not be a huge blender user unless it's a fairly large quantity, is all liquid, or needs a blade, like fruit, so we went with a handmixer.

Bacon fat was required for stuffing in our house. I did have it in mind for the yorkshire too, but it was a day-of decision and we weren't going to go buy bacon just for that. We don't typically keep bacon fat around either - we buy bacon for turkey dinners for the stuffing.
 
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