BPotW Loaves and Crumbs (Mark 7:24-30)

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Bible Passage of the Week

Luce NDs

Well-Known Member
In this interpretation of the story, Jesus's compassion and appreciation for the woman emerge. That fits within the parameters of an expanding ministry to the Gentiles.

Why did Mark tell this story? why did Matthew?

If it is primarily a story about the woman's faith, I am liking it less and less. After all, Jesus rewarding the woman for her faith in him could be a tad egotistical.

But did Jesus actually do anything to heal the child? Neither account has Jesus laying on hands, mixing his spit with dirt or any other action

The story might be saying faith accomplishes something by its very nature.

So much to ponder here.

Maybe you're beginning to observe the deeper and darker regions of the story as the absolute clashes with the abstract ... tis dark, yet a place to draw from as a font ... the myth etches on ..
 

Mystic

Well-Known Member
A Follow-Up tp Post #106:
Unlike the Syrophoenician woman, no Jewish woman in the Gospels ever dares to directly approach Jesus to request a healing. Thus, the woman
with the menstrual bleeding problems feels she must sneak up behind Jesus and touch his garment to get healed.
 

Luce NDs

Well-Known Member
A Follow-Up tp Post #106:
Unlike the Syrophoenician woman, no Jewish woman in the Gospels ever dares to directly approach Jesus to request a healing. Thus, the woman
with the menstrual bleeding problems feels she must sneak up behind Jesus and touch his garment to get healed.

Perhaps she was love sick and wished to be enlightened to begin to know the reason (explains the Y's)!
 

Waterfall

Well-Known Member
A Follow-Up tp Post #106:
Unlike the Syrophoenician woman, no Jewish woman in the Gospels ever dares to directly approach Jesus to request a healing. Thus, the woman
with the menstrual bleeding problems feels she must sneak up behind Jesus and touch his garment to get healed.
Or perhaps menstrual bleeding wasnt something she wanted to talk about in public...modesty my have played a role?
 

paradox3

Well-Known Member
Pronouns
She/Her/Her
In two of the gospel accounts (Mark, Luke) of the woman who touches the edge of Jesus's garment, Jesus feels the power leave him as she is healed..

She is praised for her faith in Matthew and Luke.

Matthew 14 v. 36 tells us that ALL who touch the edge of Jesus's garment are healed.

Is faith efficacious in bringing about healing, regardless of any action taken or not taken by Jesus? Is it out of Jesus's control and in God's hands? How else might we explain these mysterious healings?
 

Luce NDs

Well-Known Member
Interdenominational discussion on how Mary conceived today ... and the main question was who screwed up?

The bible says right off the bat that knowledge and awareness of such things is evil ... allows for some patriarchs to forget what they done ... thus the thought was dropped!
 

revjohn

Well-Known Member
In Matthew's version we have the woman use a Messianic title.

Weird that a Canaanite would know that don't you think?

The Disciples are all about Jesus sending her away. Can they not do that themselves or, have they learned not to take that initiative on their own? If only the contemporary Church could learn that lesson.

The conversation about dogs is shared and again no apparent angst in the woman that she is being verbally pushed outside. She understands the image and runs with it. Jesus commends her faith and her daughter is healed.

The details reported are not so huge as to suggest that the encounter didn't happen. Remembered differently by different witnesses is very plausible and yet the heart of the encounter is the same.

How does the scripture read us this time? What is it attempting to teach us?

Placing the Messianic title into the mouth of a Canaanite is a definite claim that Jesus is the Messiah. He doesn't correct her nor does he compel her to be silent. Maybe he figures nobody would believe her so there is no need to shut her up about it. Making her response a faith statement (rewarding her for her faith) reflects the inclusion of the Messianic title.

Clearly, the author of Matthew wants the audience to know who Jesus is.
 
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