"The Reverend ..."

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Carolla

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Just wondering - why do some people use "THE Rev" and not just "Rev"? Seems odd to me. We don't really say "The Doctor Smith" so why "The Rev"?
Curious (and maybe a bit bored!) minds want to know :)
 

Mrs.Anteater

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I am guessing its the same as “ The Honorable ....” , or “ Your Majesty” and isn’t it “ The Moderator” of the United Church?
 

Luce NDs

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The is a definitive article ... for those determinate ... quite separate in linguistics from the "a", "aus", etc. that is indeterminate as we accept the unknown with a state of interest in learning of the misty Ide!

Combines two dark side to create a spark ... recycled SOL by half measures? The genetic effect is unpredictable ... be prepared for failure and collapse of any extreme (polity)? Could be white lightening in the mystical tree ... cho quan? The vast code speaks to us ...

Something to mess with with care in tent ... the covet'd space may be under a tree of unknown attributes ... devil takes all?
 

Mendalla

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So, the explanation I find in multiple places is that "Reverend" takes the definite article because it is an adjective modifying the name rather than a noun like "Doctor". OTOH, an article from the Baltimore Sun suggested that was a relatively recent thing (19th century) and that prior to that it was treated the same as "Doctor". OTOOH (On the other other hand), Reverend precedes Doctor when someone holds both titles (as a lot of UCCan ministers seem to) and the argument for that is, again, that Reverend is an adjective modifying "Doctor" and the name. That article in the Baltimore Sun cites Merriam-Webster as stating that using the definite article with Reverend is “a matter of etiquette more than linguistic propriety.” IOW, as I read that, grammatically either is correct and it comes down to addressing the person as they and their tradition requests. Personally I don't see "The Reverend" used much today save maybe for very senior clergy like an Anglican/Episcopalian Archbishop. Mainline Protestant clergy (including UU) that I know going back to Granddad have always seemed okay not using the article.
 

Mendalla

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its the same as “ The Honorable ....”
This is actually the best of your analogies. "Honorable" (and "Right Honorable" for that matter) is an adjective modifying either the name or, in some cases, "Member" so takes the definite article as in "The Honorable Member for Kicking Horse Pass".
 

revsdd

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I am guessing its the same as “ The Honorable ....” , or “ Your Majesty” and isn’t it “ The Moderator” of the United Church?
The Moderator of the United Church (if ordained) is "The Right Reverend." Ordained former moderators are "The Very Reverend."

One difference between "Reverend" and "Doctor" is that doctor is a statement of educational qualification, whereas reverend is an honorific; it's more ontological, and points to a person's functional position and role within a community of faith.

The term "The Reverend" by the way is also used (although not commonly) in Judaism by some cantors or leading lay people in communities that don't have a rabbi.
 

Luce NDs

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Isn't a "rev" something about turning around and looking at what's following? One might learn something from that bunch of Canterbury Wanderers ... cranks my mental process ... others get vert Egos! That mystical tree combined with fallout and fallacy ...
 

Carolla

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Interesting article (no pun intended!) @Mendalla. I"m most acquainted with United churches who are more casual in their language forms ... so it strikes me as unusual when I see this used. It makes me think there is more emphasis on hierarchy, knowing one's place, formality etc.

I understand also the use of the Rev. Dr. to denote education - some people I know seem to emphasize this, and for others it's not so much of an event, and they pull out the Dr. qualification only if publishing or needing to be clear on their qualification.

When I was using the term Doctor in my example in the OP, I was actually thinking of a physician, not a PhD or a reverend. "Doctor" in that case denotes role, as well education I suppose.
 

Luce NDs

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We have been lucky having a lot of ministers of reasonable common nature of that koine! Sometimes known as homolytic ...
 

BetteTheRed

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Examining my own usage of it, I find I tend to alternate "the Rev" with "Rev Susan", depending on my audience. In person, it's often Susan. Or my dear, "ducks", hon...
 

revsdd

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Examining my own usage of it, I find I tend to alternate "the Rev" with "Rev Susan", depending on my audience. In person, it's often Susan. Or my dear, "ducks", hon...
Over the years I've been called Dr. Davis, Rev. Davis, Reverend, Pastor Davis, Pastor Steven, Rev. Steven, The Rev., Steven, Steve, Boss, Hey You, and a few things I can't mention here because children can read these pages.
 

Luce NDs

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Over the years I've been called Dr. Davis, Rev. Davis, Reverend, Pastor Davis, Pastor Steven, Rev. Steven, The Rev., Steven, Steve, Boss, Hey You, and a few things I can't mention here because children can read these pages.
Display of the word: "ineffable!" Sometimes the most effective expression of what's ineffable ... is to split wood or pound nails as ONYX! Backward XYNO's (unknown Y naughts). It's another nothing ... alternate to the aboriginal ... hear a thump in the knight ... duck, or timbre!
 
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