Science is still Weird and Cool in 2023!

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First weird, cool science post of 2023 is, not surprisingly, a study from 2022. After all, we are only 4 days into the new year.

A new study has narrowed the range in which the land bridge between North America and Asia existed, the so-called Beringia or Bering Land Bridge. This new research suggests it did not open until 35,700 years ago, a later date than some had previously proposed. A narrower window for its existence narrows the window during which humans and other creatures from Asia could have entered North America by that route. Since other evidence suggests human presence in the Americas more than 20,000 years ago, this means the ancestors of our indigenous people must have crossed shortly after the bridge appeared. Of course, the possibility of an earlier crossing of the Bering Strait by water can't be ruled out yet.


And I recently listened to a good podcast on human presence in the UK on The Ancients. It now appears that some human species, possibly one known from remains in Spain as Homo antecessor, live in the UK c. 900,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. Unfortunately, we have no fossils to confirm the species, only tools and footprints to show that they were there. After that, humans of various species came and went at least 10 times throughout the Pleistocene. The paleontologist interviewed suggested that at least 3-4 different human species (homo antecessor?, possibly homo heidelbergensis, Neanderthals, and homo sapiens) lived in the UK before homo sapiens finally settled there permanently sometime after the end of the last glacial maximum.


While The Ancients mostly deals with ancient history, host Tristan Hughes has been doing a lot of shows on prehistory, from the evolution of life to how humans (defined here as any species in the genus homo) spread to various regions and continents.
 
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What do we really know about such science as observational power ... when BS demand blind science? Thus the darker arts akin to white coat syndrome ... aand those choosing fear of knowledge of strange things become white and feint! Scared to Isis by thier own shadow ... thus ice bridges ... they too can be dicey as people that cross over on desire and will alone without a thought ...

Meet the great Dodge there ... something to be avoided as if it has no bottome like the foundation of sayr and such mules in the system undercover as vole and volition ... some pile of word must be gathered to see into ide! That which is missing is vast ....

And be quick about the mis pelt ... and the skin is lifted from what's buried there ... scrape it and do a re write ... that's scratch ... some say ratch 'd!
 
I still believe First Nations people could have been here more than 50,000 years ago. With multiple ice ages, the land bridge between Asia and Alaska could have been available much earlier. I believe there were multiple movements of people to North America over tens of thousands of years. The earliest peoples would have used technologies that were less durable or would have been reused by later peoples.
 
I still believe First Nations people could have been here more than 50,000 years ago. With multiple ice ages, the land bridge between Asia and Alaska could have been available much earlier. I believe there were multiple movements of people to North America over tens of thousands of years. The earliest peoples would have used technologies that were less durable or would have been reused by later peoples.
I read this book last winter that explores theories of much older occupation of the Americas than was once commonly believed.
 
I believe there was an article in Broadview last year about an Indigenous anthropologist who was challenging the established theories about occupation of the Americas.

In my personal experience, the physical differences between various First Nations are greater than the differences among Eurasian peoples. There are also huge differences in structure and sounds between the various language groups which suggest to me different originating peoples.

I do not understand why Caucasian anthropologists are determined to minimize how long they have been in the Americas.
 
Imagine 35000 years not settling well with those determined on the way to go ... with a minor 5000 yod sor sow ...
 
I do not understand why Caucasian anthropologists are determined to minimize how long they have been in the Americas.
A couple of guesses:
Shorter residency supports the idea that the land was not really claimed by anybody so it was available when the Europeans arrived (in some twisted logic)
Shorter residency allows some to argue that there was no real civilization in the Americas, only uncivilized savages (which requires ignoring a whole bunch of other evidence to the contrary)
 
Shorter residency allows some to argue that there was no real civilization in the Americas, only uncivilized savages
Which is not supported by the archaeology. Look up Cahokia. Not to mention the early civilizations in Mexico and Central America, some of which go back to BCE.

My sense is that there is wider acceptance of an earlier arrival, though, even if older theories still have their supporters. Even this result is not really aimed at shortening how long humans were here but pinning down the geology of the Ice Age. It was a geology study, not an anthropology one, even if it does have implications for anthropology. And if they arrived c. 35K years ago, as an arrival shortly after this appearance of the Bering land bridge suggests, that still pushes the timeframe back relative to what we have in terms of fossils. And it not an accepted hypothesis yet, just a new proposal.

Apparently, genomic evidence looking at indigenous Americans and Asian indigenous peoples near Beringia currently suggests arrival in Beringia (the land bridge and its end points in Alaska and Siberia) around 30-40K years ago with a move into the rest of North American later.

So, my guess would 35-40K years ago, and that would fit with, say, the White Sands, New Mexico footprints, one of the best accepted early sites, at 18-26K assuming time needed to get to the Southwest from Alaska.

The Clovis-first people are still strong, though, and constantly poking holes in this new evidence. They are the ones Jim is really referring to, here. IMHO, the theory that the Clovis people at 14-16K years ago were the beginning of permanent human habitation in the Americas needs to die at this point.

BTW, another option would be a scenario like we see in the UK, where there were multiple human arrivals. That would account for some of the finds that radically predate even sites like White Sands while still making a later migration the ancestors of the indigenous people. It would also open the door to Denisovans or even Erectus arriving first (Neanderthals were most in Western Asia and Europe so unlikely to reach here).

The bottom line is that the anthropology of the Americas, like some other regions, is very much in flux right now due to these new findings. There will be resistance, as there always is, but there are also supporters both indigenous and non-indigenous for the earlier arrival dates.
 
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Which is not supported by the archaeology. Look up Cahokia. Not to mention the early civilizations in Mexico and Central America, some of which go back to BCE.

My sense is that there is wider acceptance of an earlier arrival, though, even if older theories still have their supporters. Even this result is not really aimed at shortening how long humans were here but pinning down the geology of the Ice Age. It was a geology study, not an anthropology one, even if it does have implications for anthropology. And if they arrived c. 35K years ago, as an arrival shortly after this appearance of the Bering land bridge suggests, that still pushes the timeframe back relative to what we have in terms of fossils. And it not an accepted hypothesis yet, just a new proposal.

Apparently, genomic evidence looking at indigenous Americans and Asian indigenous peoples near Beringia currently suggests arrival in Beringia (the land bridge and its end points in Alaska and Siberia) around 30-40K years ago with a move into the rest of North American later.

So, my guess would 35-40K years ago, and that would fit with, say, the White Sands, New Mexico footprints, one of the best accepted early sites, at 18-26K assuming time needed to get to the Southwest from Alaska.

The Clovis-first people are still strong, though, and constantly poking holes in this new evidence. They are the ones Jim is really referring to, here. IMHO, the theory that the Clovis people at 14-16K years ago were the beginning of permanent human habitation in the Americas needs to die at this point.

BTW, another option would be a scenario like we see in the UK, where there were multiple human arrivals. That would account for some of the finds that radically predate even sites like White Sands while still making a later migration the ancestors of the indigenous people. It would also open the door to Denisovans or even Erectus arriving first (Neanderthals were most in Western Asia and Europe so unlikely to reach here).

The bottom line is that the anthropology of the Americas, like some other regions, is very much in flux right now due to these new findings. There will be resistance, as there always is, but there are also supporters both indigenous and non-indigenous for the earlier arrival dates.
Were the continents closer together then or still further apart? ( continental drift)
 
Were the continents closer together then or still further apart? ( continental drift)
Roughly where they are now, in fact, from any maps I have seen. The land bridge was the result of water levels falling due to the water being locked up in the ice sheets during glacial maxima. Same with the land bridges connecting the UK to Europe that came and went, with the most dramatic being Doggerland, basically a small continent unto itself where the North Sea is now that connected Scotland to where the low countries and Denmark are today.
 
Roughly where they are now, in fact, from any maps I have seen. The land bridge was the result of water levels falling due to the water being locked up in the ice sheets during glacial maxima. Same with the land bridges connecting the UK to Europe that came and went, with the most dramatic being Doggerland, basically a small continent unto itself where the North Sea is now that connected Scotland to where the low countries and Denmark are today.
Interesting
 
To me multiple arrivals make the most sense, just as there were multiple arrivals in most of Eurasia. Our ancestors seemed to be very mobile once they left East Africa.
 
A rare green comet will be passing over the northern hemisphere in January ( southern hemisphere in February) It was just discovered in March 2022 and it was last seen 50,000 years ago. So look up with your telescopes and binoculars (and possibly it may also be visible to the naked eye at the end of January). This Thursday it will be close to the Sun making it brighter.
Look Northeast, low on the horizon, just before midnight on January 12th with binoculars or telescope.
As the comet nears earth, it can be seen throughout January near Polaris (North Star) in the evening.
 
The BBC are making asses of themselves. Well, not really. However, they do have a nice piece out on research into how donkeys, aka asses, were bred from domesticated wild asses. The donkey, and the donkey-horse hybrid the mule, has been a valuable animal partner for millennia, carrying goods far and wide around the world. Apparently, the Romans even had huge (by donkey standards) donkeys. And a recent study suggests that it all began in the Horn of Africa 7000ish years ago.

 
Yet mullish Ness continues as a dark void ... it is resistant to distant onservation as the infinite remains far out ...

It is said that in everyone ... as mono ... is a mule ... a working bit ... so dispose of it! Thus the pious psyche ... prepare it could evolve ...
 
I talked about Steve Brusatte in the "what are you reading?" thread but here's the man himself giving a 1 hour lecture based on his book Rise & Reign of Mammals from last year. Brusatte is an American paleontologist on faculty at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. While he started out researching dinosaurs, his recent work has been focused on the rapid evolution of mammals in the period just after the extinction of the dinosaurs. Hence the topic of this latest book.

 
Mammals may be going bust because of lack of appreciation by themselves ... the self is something to know! Thus busts on columns ... stand outs ... resmbling fallacy of ethic ...
 
Mammals may be going bust because of lack of appreciation by themselves ...
Maybe a specific species of them, sure.;) I have little doubt that our immediate successors as dominant species will also be mammalian, though probably not primates. Birds might be a second choice, though losing their arms to create wings would be a bit of a disadvantage in some ways.
 
Maybe a specific species of them, sure.;) I have little doubt that our immediate successors as dominant species will also be mammalian, though probably not primates. Birds might be a second choice, though losing their arms to create wings would be a bit of a disadvantage in some ways.


Some feel that gnawing urge to escapism ... and thus the bust is on ... just how it goes ... mysterious and methodical myth ... thus rites of passage!

In theory of the big wheels it may be a small point ... period? Denotes the temp oral in some cases as go nutz ... espectially about fixation ...

Is that established as motive ... another urge ante conflict to support the dark game ... the mystery is off there ...

Catches me in a leaning of not knowing what to think as BS but pondering further on ...
 
Here's an interesting tale. Antibiotic resistance, and antibiotics, predate us by millions, maybe billions, of years. In fact, they seem to be part of how bacteria build and maintain communities (e.g. the colonies of bacteria that form biofilms). Which has implications for how we handle the current crisis of antibiotic resistance.


And also from SciShow, controlling lightning with ... LASERS!

 
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