Old Family Photos

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paradox3

Peanuts Fan
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Do you have a collection of old family photographs? Have you done anything to organize them?

If you haven't done so, do you think you ever will?

If you have taken on this task, how did you go about it? Was it a daunting experience? Are you satisfied with the end results?
 
Our family photos are mostly archived at the cottage where, in theory, we call have access. However, we haven't been in a while. I do have my baby book and school records (with photos for most years) so have some of my own old photos. And, of course, Mrs. M and I have a good collection of photos from our family and relationship.

Our paper albums are basically chronological with some hiccups. e.g. all pictures larger than 5x7 are in the same album due to it being the only one with larger sheet pockets. Our wedding has its own albums, too.

Digital are in folders by year and then subfolders by date or (for vacations) trip, with the trips then subdivided further by day. But we've built that digital structure as we upload them from the camera(s) so it has never been much work. We do periodically attempt to rename the photos to better describe the contents but usually falter at some point, esp. with longer trips where our love of taking pictures (and our current camera's fairly large memory card) can leave us with hundreds.
 
How old do you consider old?

Yes, I did a whole bunch of scanning and uploading to Facebook when my Dad was alive. It was a good thing to do when he was living in his home. Allowed conversation.
My uncle has been reviewing them over the years, and distant cousins on Dad's side have reviewed.
Some may come into ancestry as they are old enough and the people are long dead.
 
I have a very sad story about a box of black and white photos. Mom and I went through them while she was still living here. Because I'm lazy, and like easy org systems, I put them in envelopes with the subjects names on them. Didn't the box fall out of the closet one day, years later, and the photos all got separated from their envelopes. So that was an exercise in futility...
 
How old do you consider old?
I was thinking about anything old enough to be in hard copy only.

Was wondering if anyone would scan them as part of an organization strategy. Sounds like that was your approach.
I have also heard people say that if your old photos aren't organized to begin with, simply scanning them all will leave you with a mess of a different kind.
 
I sorted them first, really reducing the volume.
Then scanned them, and put them into facebook albums based on era or event and tagged them.
Family has enjoyed them
 
I have a very sad story about a box of black and white photos. Mom and I went through them while she was still living here. Because I'm lazy, and like easy org systems, I put them in envelopes with the subjects names on them. Didn't the box fall out of the closet one day, years later, and the photos all got separated from their envelopes. So that was an exercise in futility...
I, too, have run into grief with the envelop approach. Much better to jot a date or name on the back of each photo.

I have some old prints from the 50's and 60's which came back from processing with the dates in their borders. Very helpful, although in my case, it's not unusual to find a Christmas picture dated May (for example) Those dates tell you when the film was developed, not when the pictures were taken.

Later digital cameras with their time stamps were even more helpful.
 
I have just completed the task of going through old photos and other family memorabilia. I now have a nice set of albums which are organized into themes. Chronological order within each album but there is some crossover between themes

Will answer my own question. Yes I am satisfied with the end result. It was a time consuming project but worthwhile. Therapeutic even.

Now I am wondering if I should scan everything I have decided to keep.

Not sure how to go about this. Would I scan the albums one page at a time, do you think?
 
I have made a 'good start' on the family photos - several times. The ancient ones have been scanned and reside somewhere on a computer or two. My female young ask fairly frequently about my progress with this task. I have taken to responding with 'when are you coming to help?'

The bottom of a double closet is stacked with books and boxes of photos. None of the kids ever suggest sitting down to look at them and continue sorting. My puter has uncounted many thousands of images too.

I suspect the photographic family history will be something my young will be upset about at some point in the future when they don't have names for the faces.
 
Wow, that is a LOT of of old photos @KayTheCurler

Going through our family photos, I made the decision to discard pix from the 50's and 60's (England relatives) that I could not identify. I know that my father, who passed away recently, could not identify them either.

I have kept some really old photos of unidentified ancestors. I mean really OLD. There is only a small envelope of these.

I also have an envelope of known ancestors. These are all duplicates but I decided they were worth keeping.

Might have decided otherwise if I had boxes and boxes of the things.
 
I have a photo that goes back to the Boer War - and the fife that belonged to the man in the picture. I was told by my mum that she knew of him as Uncle Enoch, and we thought he was probably my Nana's uncle. I have a photo that shows my mum as a new baby (Pre WW1). There are some from when I was a kid (one daughter can accurately name us), and some from my own kids childhoods.
 
I spent hours sorting photos by sibling and it was unexpectedly rewarding. Putting them together made a beautiful narrative history of each one. Great for a birthday album.
 
The old family albums might have a few pics going back to WWI and a bit earlier. Baby and childhood pics of grandparents and that sort of thing.
 
I digitized all our albums one year as a surprise for hubby’s birthday . He was away for a week on business and I did it all day everyday. Good it was a lot of work. I became quite picky about what deserved to be digital. No random scenery!

when my parents died we had a couple of drawers of random photos. Dated from their early married during the war, through our early childhood. We each took a few . When my in laws died they had thousands of random photos. Generally not in albums. Random people we didn’t know. Hundreds of mountains. Almost all got tossed. Which is a surprisingly sad thing to do
 
Not surprised to hear that the project took you a week @Lastpointe. A huge job for sure.

I hear you about the scenery and the mountains. In our family it seems to be sunsets and pictures of big fish. How many of these shots does anyone really need???
 
In my series of family photos (and I have 50 boxes of slide carousels to digitize; I've done 8), it's picture after picture after picture of my Dad's model boats, floating somewhere.
 
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