Hospital stays

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JayneWonders

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Have you had many hospital stays as a patient (or as the caregiver)

Were they close to home or distant?

What made them survivable?

Do you have any learnings to share with others? Some of us are aging and there is a reasonable probability our time spent will increase.

Do you have memorable highs or lows? What did you learn from those moments that is worth sharing?
 
My hospital stays began when i was 15. A 2.5 week stay in local hospital, followed by readmittance in said hospital for tests, then approx 6 weeks at Sick Kids in Being released for Christmas

Of course, I've had the small in/out stays a number of times for surgeries, and challenging times.

One of the most unique things that someone did for me when at the hospital was give a box of individual small gifts. I was to open one a day.

How I would ponder, touch and explore the gifts wondering which one to open tomorrow.

It gave my guests something to talk about, too

I have used that same idea with others who are ill
 
Five days getting a variety of tests to confirm I had pulmonary sarcoidosis and not lymphatic cancer in my lungs. A bit over two hours from where we lived. My wife was about four months pregnant with our first child. I just started a new teaching job. I was in the application process to enter theological school as a candidate. And we had just sold our dream house with the condition of the finishing work being completed.
 
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My hospital stays began when i was 15. A 2.5 week stay in local hospital, followed by readmittance in said hospital for tests, then approx 6 weeks at Sick Kids in Being released for Christmas

Of course, I've had the small in/out stays a number of times for surgeries, and challenging times.

One of the most unique things that someone did for me when at the hospital was give a box of individual small gifts. I was to open one a day.

How I would ponder, touch and explore the gifts wondering which one to open tomorrow.

It gave my guests something to talk about, too

I have used that same idea with others who are ill
Good idea!
 
My stays have all been fairly short. A few overnight ones. All were within the same city, maybe a neighbouring city when we lived within the GRE but not Edmonton itself, I'm not sure if I used an Edmonton hospital at the time or not.
What made them all survivable? Mostly f***ing luck. I don't think at any one of them were my needs properly managed. The last day stay (not counting things like MRIs, appointments) was a bit better, but still the timing was off and I was not notified. I probably should have just infused a 2nd time, but that's hindsight. It's funny my last MRI they were much more considered about the timing as things were running behind. I'm not even totally convinced the contrast agent is a trigger, but I pretreat just in case. If there was a delay for that I wouldn't be too concerned, it was nice to see they wanted to ensure I was able to properly protect myself though.
 
Five days getting a variety of tests to confirm I had pulmonary sarcoidosis and not lymphatic cancer in my lungs. A bit over two hours from where we lived. My wife was about four months pregnant with our first child. I just started a new teaching job. I was in the application process to enter theological school as a candidate. And we had just sold our dream house with the condition of the finishing work being completed.
What stress you must have been under, as well as your your wife.

Can you think of anything that helped?
 
My only experience with being hospitalized myself is for ten days during one of my pregnancies and following childbirth X2.

Not terrible at all.

My mom and dad were both hospitalized with two major fractures in the last decade of their lives.

It is a different kettle of fish altogether when the patient is in pain and confused.

What helped? I dunno. Advocacy I guess but it only takes you so far.
 
Attitude: life is; do what needs to be done; trust God is with us in all that is happening.
Gratitude: grateful for the new job, the new life on its way, successfully selling our house when the market was terrible to the first and only couple to look at the house, all the medical care, the people supporting me as a prospective candidate, being able to move into a friends cottage on another lake, and much more.
Fortitude..
Resilience from going through many other challenges.
Anticipatory excitement regarding seminary and living in Halifax.
 
At the local hospital, I seem to remember that I was in an adult area. I had semi private, but for some reason, i seem to remember being on a ward.

At Sick kids, i was in a semi private on one floor, then later moved to orthaepedic floor and a big ward, with more wards across from us.

In the first area, I don't think i had anyone else in the room. I was fairly ill. My parents drove down every day after dad's work, but dad would often would wander the halls. He would talk to other parents. It helped him.

A small lad came to see me on day 1, he asked a series of questions. About an hour later, he returned. He asked the same set of questions. This went on, hour after hour. When my mom arrived, she chastised me for being curt to him. Later we would find out he had had multiple shunts on his brain. My patience increased with meds and knowledge

At one point a semi private came open, but they couldn't maneuver my bed into it.

In the wards were teens. Many were on Stryker frames. The nurses would put movies on for us on the tvs on the side walls, and many of us had prism glasses to be able to watch when lying flat. One night we were all watching a horror film, when all the rooms started howling. The nurses came running. What was the matter? The film had a person screaming as they were on the rack. Hah - have you ever seen scoliosis treatment?

I didn't recollect much of the individuals, but we would help each other. Calling for a nurse if someone was ill. Sharing food. Parents would bring treats

************""
So for making it better to deal with difficult fellow patients, learning about them

Recognizing that I too was not functioning. Not sure how much I realized that, though must have been doing ok, as the nurses gave me a small handbell to ring when needing more meds.

For all, just be a good citizen. Help when you can. Find something to laugh about in trying times
 
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I lost my appendix during vacation in Austria at the age of 7. I was in a six adults bedroom. The outside wall was all glass window showing a view of snowy mountains and wildflower meadow. The six women all wanted to make me eat. I remember “milk soup” being very disgusting and they were pressuring me to eat it. ( I didn’t). My family came to visit for the one hour a day and had to bring softcover books- I compensated the situation with reading two books a day and soon the local book store ran out of new books. I think I was in 10 or 12 days- I was dehydrated at first.
During my stay, they had some kind of a “ variety show one evening, done by the staff(?) being all dressed up.
The hospital was so full that beds were in the hallway, where there was another child who lost her tonsils and got to eat ice cream all the time ( better than milk soup). Once I was discharged there were only a few days until vacation was over. Returning to school, I was excellent in reading, having practiced so much.
 
I lost my appendix during vacation in Austria at the age of 7. I was in a six adults bedroom. The outside wall was all glass window showing a view of snowy mountains and wildflower meadow. The six women all wanted to make me eat. I remember “milk soup” being very disgusting and they were pressuring me to eat it. ( I didn’t). My family came to visit for the one hour a day and had to bring softcover books- I compensated the situation with reading two books a day and soon the local book store ran out of new books. I think I was in 10 or 12 days- I was dehydrated at first.
During my stay, they had some kind of a “ variety show one evening, done by the staff(?) being all dressed up.
The hospital was so full that beds were in the hallway, where there was another child who lost her tonsils and got to eat ice cream all the time ( better than milk soup). Once I was discharged there were only a few days until vacation was over. Returning to school, I was excellent in reading, having practiced so much.
Not quite the Austrian vacation you were expecting I would imagine.
One of my surgeries I do remember get popsicles, not ice-cream. It's the only good thing I remember from the childhood surgery part. Many more negatives.

Some of the pre-admission stuff was fun.
 
I lost my appendix during vacation in Austria at the age of 7. I was in a six adults bedroom. The outside wall was all glass window showing a view of snowy mountains and wildflower meadow. The six women all wanted to make me eat. I remember “milk soup” being very disgusting and they were pressuring me to eat it. ( I didn’t). My family came to visit for the one hour a day and had to bring softcover books- I compensated the situation with reading two books a day and soon the local book store ran out of new books. I think I was in 10 or 12 days- I was dehydrated at first.
During my stay, they had some kind of a “ variety show one evening, done by the staff(?) being all dressed up.
The hospital was so full that beds were in the hallway, where there was another child who lost her tonsils and got to eat ice cream all the time ( better than milk soup). Once I was discharged there were only a few days until vacation was over. Returning to school, I was excellent in reading, having practiced so much.
Oh, remember visiting hour? Now you are encouraged to be present.

How neat that you used that time to improve your reading
 
Another commonality between us @JayneWonders ..I "lived" at Sick Kids for several months, then back and forth for a couple of years. A brief stint at Princess Margaret too. My mother came daily (on the bus from Cambridge) -- my dad usually on weekends. The few days my mom couldn't make it were very sad and lonely. This was early '60s and there was no child life program or any specialized emotional support at all. Mum never came empty-handed. Always books or the "fairy tale" comic books. I did a lot of reading, but I had to repeat a grade since I missed so much class time. I wandered freely around the hospital -- no one noticed me checking everything out - I stabbed myself with a needle playing with hypodermic syringes in a supply room. I explored different wards. Looked at gruesome medical texts, went up to the roof a lot. Risky because I fainted sometimes when I was walking around.....I'll write a book someday.
Apart from that, only 4 days when I had my baby.
 
Another commonality between us @JayneWonders ..I "lived" at Sick Kids for several months, then back and forth for a couple of years. A brief stint at Princess Margaret too. My mother came daily (on the bus from Cambridge) -- my dad usually on weekends. The few days my mom couldn't make it were very sad and lonely. This was early '60s and there was no child life program or any specialized emotional support at all. Mum never came empty-handed. Always books or the "fairy tale" comic books. I did a lot of reading, but I had to repeat a grade since I missed so much class time. I wandered freely around the hospital -- no one noticed me checking everything out - I stabbed myself with a needle playing with hypodermic syringes in a supply room. I explored different wards. Looked at gruesome medical texts, went up to the roof a lot. Risky because I fainted sometimes when I was walking around.....I'll write a book someday.
Apart from that, only 4 days when I had my bababy.
Why were you hospitalized so long? My experience has been they try to avoid keeping people in-patient. Used to go 3x a day for a while as an out patient.
There were also times nurses shared I should have been admitted but due to lack of resources I wasn't.
 
That is interesting Ninj.

I was there in 73.

I was on a stretcher or in bed for most of my stay. I had a frame that I could use with my arms to lift myself, shimmy up/down bed. Got quite strong. Also had iv for most of stay on orthaepedic floor. Oh, how i hated the smell of amoxicillin in my skin, sweat, etc

But!!!! Once i was able to be in a wheelchair, i got into wheelchair races in the hall. Plus there was a place that teens could go -- it had a pool table. Not easy to play pool in a wheelchair. Earlier in my stay, someone took me up once on a stretcher after a particularly brutal experience with a doctor.

One of the things that showed how they were trying to help was that you could write food onto your food order, like hamburger and fries.

I was lucky with school. I did have work brought into me once treatment started. I got home at Christmas. I think went back to school sometime in January. Ended up only writing spring exams. Got marks up enough to be able to skip final.

You know i do remember telling my mom she didn't have to come every day. I had a little sister that needed her and older siblings. I remember being quite sad when she didn't. It is good that so much has changed re that aspect of stays
 
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Why were you hospitalized so long? My experience has been they try to avoid keeping people in-patient. Used to go 3x a day for a while as an out patient.
There were also times nurses shared I should have been admitted but due to lack of resources I wasn't.
It was 1961. Long hospital stays were the norm before they figured out patients did better at home.
 
Why were you hospitalized so long? My experience has been they try to avoid keeping people in-patient. Used to go 3x a day for a while as an out patient.
There were also times nurses shared I should have been admitted but due to lack of resources I wasn't.
I had a rare, serious but not fatal condition. Langerhans cell histiocytosis. I had the type that interfered with rbc production and skeletal involvement (the bones in my fingers actually split) I still have after effects from that.
 
My brother was in Sick Kids in the early 70's for surgery and recovery. My mom spent many hours there as I remember. I visited a few times and found it quite awful. The building was very old and the atmosphere bleak.

There has been at least one major rebuild since those days. They have become more family - friendly too, I hear.
 
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