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ChemGal

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(I knew you, specifically, were going to say that! About pits and about your dog! 6th sense. )Then why do we more often hear of a dog who attacked and harmed someone, getting put down - and it's a pit bull? I don't think it's an irrational fear. They shouldn't be city/ neighbourhood pets. They belong in rural areas.


I hope you keep Lucy on a leash (and a muzzle) around people if she's that dangerous!
1) Do you mean the American pit bull terrier or do you mean the common usage of 'pit bull' that covers various breeds as well as deliberate cross and mutts? If the latter, it's understandable that is likely to cover a fairly large number of dogs compared to a specific breed term. I think some people are also bad at identifying dogs and the negative stigma can be added in when a dog report is reported.
2) Little dogs often get a pass even when they do harm due to the limited amount of damage.
3) Who owns the dog, some people want the 'pit bull' type due to the image and they also encourage the aggressive behaviour.

I'm happy with the bylaws here, it's about the dog and not the breed.
 

BetteTheRed

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I dislike small dogs for exactly the reason identified by chemgal above.

Lucy is leashed and in a "halti" (a modified muzzle) whenever she's out, except in her own backyard. She also wears a yellow ribbon.

I'm rarely terrified of large dogs. They're usually pretty amenable to a "git, you" in a loud voice. (I have a childhood photo of a very small "me" in company of what looks like quite a grumpy dog; we're chill.) I'm personally more terrified of a small loose dog approaching us and Lucy killing it.
 

Lastpointe

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You were smart to stay still Kimmio. Likely that dog didn’t understand your scooter so it was defending its owner perhaps

lots of dogs can be unexpectedly dangerous. It helps to be able to read their body language

i agree that little dogs get a pass for bad behaviour

was once walking my dog on leash in a park. Three old ladies approaching with their little white dogs. One charged at us. Barking like crazy. Luckily my dog is generally pretty calm so didn’t even bark back

i told the ladies to put the dogs on leash. Got the whole. “ he isn’t bothering you, so little” type of answer

aggressive is aggressive. Though at least when the dog is small you can deter it with a hard kick
 

revjohn

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When you read about someone randomly getting their face chewed off - it's always a pit bull!
There is some sensationalization going on.

Before I left Brantford to return to NL we had a number of dog attacks. In that instance I believe it was a large Shepherd or some type that had attacked and killed at least one small dog while the smaller dog was on leash with its elderly owner.

Prior to the Pit-Bull fear mongering it was Doberman fear mongering and before that it was something else.

Pit Bulls are, apparently more effective and in attacks involving Pit-Bulls there tends to be a higher human fatality rate. In 2019 Pit Bulls accounted for 69% of all dog attack fatalities in the US (there were 48 fatalities

Malamutes are statistically more prone to biting than any other breed 5x more likely to bit than a Pit Bull.

The Kangal Shepherd has the most powerful bite at 750 lbs per square inch to the Pit Bull's 250 lbs per square inch.

So why are Pit Bulls such a high fatality animal. I suspect it is the prey they are attacking rather than the proficiency of the predator animal. Statistics compiled from 2005 to 2017 looked at the 433 Americans killed by dog attack and found that 36% of those deaths involved individuals 50+ with the second largest group being new-borns to toddlers at 27% The highest age specific victim of fatal dog attacks are infants less than one month old which make up almost half of the newborn to toddler category.

That said dog attacks are fairly rare events.

In my 56 years I have only been attacked by a dog once. I was delivering flyers door to door when a dog came through a screen door at me. I had my back to the animal at the time and could tell by the sound of the dog's bark that it was a smaller dog. I guessed it was going for my left leg and so I swung my left had behind me and managed to grab it by the muzzle before I was struck.

I held that little monster tightly and lifted it off the ground which triggered a lot of panicked yelping and brought an angry owner to the door thinking I was abusing her animal.

I explained that I was attacked that she had a dangerous animal and if I wanted to make a big deal out of it we would find out if any neighbours had been attacked (big crowd out now with the dog yelping and her screaming) and in that case I would push to have the dog put down. I then handed her back her dog and continued on my way. She apologized and quickly retreated into her home other neighbours confirmed that the animal was a problem.

Which makes me feel bad. The only reason that animal was that ornery is that it is poorly managed. I have no doubt that she loved her dog as much as I have loved each of mine but if your dog is aggressive you need to protect it and the rest of the community. Daisy is by no means an aggressive dog. She loves people and other dogs but if you don't know dogs you could easily confuse her charging at you to say hi with an animal about to tackle prey.

Neighbours walking their dogs in our neighbourhood are coming to expect her tearing down the driveway to say hi. She typically stops when she is 2-3 metres away from her new friend to see if they are cool or not. Only once has she so startled someone that they ran and well, she loves to run also so that is not the best way to get away from her. That resulted in an elevated heart rate for all involved. I clearly need to do more work on the discipline end to break her of the habit of high speed greetings which I have been on the painful end of more than anybody else. Still some puppy brain at work.
 

Lastpointe

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I have only been attacked once when with my dog. A loose dog charged across the road and grabbed my bouvier by the throat. I’m screaming. The dogs is helping. This other dog is holding on. A man charged across the road and kicked the dog several times in the head. It let go and ran

yikes. I reported it but it was long gone

when I walked to the subway to meet hubby a couple of hours later I carried a hammer. Which I assume looked a bit strange
 
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There is some sensationalization going on.

Before I left Brantford to return to NL we had a number of dog attacks. In that instance I believe it was a large Shepherd or some type that had attacked and killed at least one small dog while the smaller dog was on leash with its elderly owner.

Prior to the Pit-Bull fear mongering it was Doberman fear mongering and before that it was something else.

Pit Bulls are, apparently more effective and in attacks involving Pit-Bulls there tends to be a higher human fatality rate. In 2019 Pit Bulls accounted for 69% of all dog attack fatalities in the US (there were 48 fatalities

Malamutes are statistically more prone to biting than any other breed 5x more likely to bit than a Pit Bull.

The Kangal Shepherd has the most powerful bite at 750 lbs per square inch to the Pit Bull's 250 lbs per square inch.

So why are Pit Bulls such a high fatality animal. I suspect it is the prey they are attacking rather than the proficiency of the predator animal. Statistics compiled from 2005 to 2017 looked at the 433 Americans killed by dog attack and found that 36% of those deaths involved individuals 50+ with the second largest group being new-borns to toddlers at 27% The highest age specific victim of fatal dog attacks are infants less than one month old which make up almost half of the newborn to toddler category.

That said dog attacks are fairly rare events.

In my 56 years I have only been attacked by a dog once. I was delivering flyers door to door when a dog came through a screen door at me. I had my back to the animal at the time and could tell by the sound of the dog's bark that it was a smaller dog. I guessed it was going for my left leg and so I swung my left had behind me and managed to grab it by the muzzle before I was struck.

I held that little monster tightly and lifted it off the ground which triggered a lot of panicked yelping and brought an angry owner to the door thinking I was abusing her animal.

I explained that I was attacked that she had a dangerous animal and if I wanted to make a big deal out of it we would find out if any neighbours had been attacked (big crowd out now with the dog yelping and her screaming) and in that case I would push to have the dog put down. I then handed her back her dog and continued on my way. She apologized and quickly retreated into her home other neighbours confirmed that the animal was a problem.

Which makes me feel bad. The only reason that animal was that ornery is that it is poorly managed. I have no doubt that she loved her dog as much as I have loved each of mine but if your dog is aggressive you need to protect it and the rest of the community. Daisy is by no means an aggressive dog. She loves people and other dogs but if you don't know dogs you could easily confuse her charging at you to say hi with an animal about to tackle prey.

Neighbours walking their dogs in our neighbourhood are coming to expect her tearing down the driveway to say hi. She typically stops when she is 2-3 metres away from her new friend to see if they are cool or not. Only once has she so startled someone that they ran and well, she loves to run also so that is not the best way to get away from her. That resulted in an elevated heart rate for all involved. I clearly need to do more work on the discipline end to break her of the habit of high speed greetings which I have been on the painful end of more than anybody else. Still some puppy brain at work.
I'm not sure if I looked like prey or a playmate to this pit bull. I was sitting on my scooter with my back to it. I am not 50 or over, or a kid - but seniors ride scooters, and kids are closer to the ground as are scooter riders. I had not seen or looked at it behind me until the owner called it. So I assume it was not playing. And I didn't want to "play" with it anyway. I don't like even the nicest dogs jumping on me, so I'm glad the owner was able to call her dog back to her. I don't know - and I'm glad I don't - but I think that was a close call.
 
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I dislike small dogs for exactly the reason identified by chemgal above.

Lucy is leashed and in a "halti" (a modified muzzle) whenever she's out, except in her own backyard. She also wears a yellow ribbon.

I'm rarely terrified of large dogs. They're usually pretty amenable to a "git, you" in a loud voice. (I have a childhood photo of a very small "me" in company of what looks like quite a grumpy dog; we're chill.) I'm personally more terrified of a small loose dog approaching us and Lucy
I didnt even know until you mentioned it, what a yellow ribbon on a dog means. Does anyone, except dog owners?
 
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1) Do you mean the American pit bull terrier or do you mean the common usage of 'pit bull' that covers various breeds as well as deliberate cross and mutts? If the latter, it's understandable that is likely to cover a fairly large number of dogs compared to a specific breed term. I think some people are also bad at identifying dogs and the negative stigma can be added in when a dog report is reported.
2) Little dogs often get a pass even when they do harm due to the limited amount of damage.
3) Who owns the dog, some people want the 'pit bull' type due to the image and they also encourage the aggressive behaviour.

I'm happy with the bylaws here, it's about the dog and not the breed.
I have no idea what exact breed for sure Chemgal. It was a big solid muscular dog with a pit bull face running at me from behind. I made a point not to stare at it. I turned my head and saw it coming, then turned it forward again and looked straight ahead and stayed still. No time for calculated breed determination. The owner was yelling quite commandingly with a tough tone like she knew it might be a problem.
 
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ChemGal

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I have no idea what exact breed for sure Chemgal. It was a big solid muscular dog with a pit bull face running at me from behind. I made a point not to stare at it. I turned my head and saw it coming, then turned it forward again and looked straight ahead and stayed still. No time for calculated breed determination. The owner was yelling quite commandingly with a tough tone like she knew it might be a problem.
I was referencing the most often hear about them with dog attacks.

My family has had some run ins in the past month.
I was dealing with an aggressive yorkie on a walk. It was dark, owner smoking on porch, I was a few houses away from crossing him and he starts calling out a name, I keep walking assuming he's trying to get a cat back in. His calls start to get more and more intense, I keep walking, moving quickly due to the smoke. Suddenly some comes darting at me, didn't notice it earlier because it's dark and it was on lawns, the same colours as leaves. At first I was just ignore it, as it overshot me and kept walking past, it turned around though and started after me aggressively so I turned around. Owner calls out hey, it won't bite. I wasn't too convinced and was prepared to kick the thing. Standoff was something like this for a while, yes I was walking backwards, slowly -

Ok, so not that bad, but I was concerned about getting bit, as a dog bite for me is going to have more serious consequences than for the average person and it didn't help I was wearing thin leggings. Eventually the thing went to it's owner but he was calling it over with urgency and had started to walk over before that happened.

My dad was bit a few times by a border collie. It's young and is known to be a biter. 2 dogs, both fairly 'friendly' easily get loose. The will come up all friendly but one is very quick to bite. My dad was trying to get them into a yard (they chase cars, so a safety concern) and the thing bit his arm twice. He didn't know the dogs but there were a few people trying to get them off the street - some kids were in a vehicle and they wouldn't get out while the dogs were loose as they said the one was a biter.
 
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I'm online quite a bit and I read local news - and see stories now and then about dog attacks over the years. I'd never heard of the yellow ribbon until Bette brought it up. It should be mentioned with such stories. The only obvious identifiers I know are assistance dogs' vests - and that we're not supposed to pet working dogs (unless owner says it's okay. I had a coworker who often let people pet her assistance dog. She was pretty loose with that rule - she'd had her dog for a long time and her dog still obeyed her well.)
 
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There's a dog across the street. Two dogs. A weimereimer (sp?) and a German Shephard who is just barely full grown but still a pup. He was a half grown pup at the time... The older dog went after a dog who was being walked past their house, while they were sitting in lounge chairs on their small yard beside their driveway. The dog who was attacked was a border collie mix of some kind, an old slow dog.

I was just heading out or in and was on the sidewalk in front of my house. The neighbours dog bit that dog. I think it she may have been protecting the puppy, or instinctively acted as if she was. The owner of the bitten dog crossed the street and was in our driveway for a minute calming her dog down while the neighbours settled theirs down and chastised her. Now she often barks at me when she sees me because I think she associates me with that event - because I was close by watching, and my scent was there at the time, too. She didn't do that with me before the incident.
 
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Mrs.Anteater

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Owner calls out hey, it won't bite.
Honestly, I am all for dog owners needing a licence for dogs bigger than one can squish with a boot.
The amount of dog owners who think that their dogs are completely harmless and do not have any knowledge about dog behaviours and instincts. Like my neighbours who keep hitting their pitbulls for bad behaviour but think they have control over them. Funny, the dogs still do all the stuff they shouldn’t and ” require” them to keep hitting them.
 

ChemGal

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Honestly, I am all for dog owners needing a licence for dogs bigger than one can squish with a boot.
The amount of dog owners who think that their dogs are completely harmless and do not have any knowledge about dog behaviours and instincts. Like my neighbours who keep hitting their pitbulls for bad behaviour but think they have control over them. Funny, the dogs still do all the stuff they shouldn’t and ” require” them to keep hitting them.
Here a licence is required for all dogs. Seems reasonable to me.
 

ChemGal

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I'm online quite a bit and I read local news - and see stories now and then about dog attacks over the years. I'd never heard of the yellow ribbon until Bette brought it up. It should be mentioned with such stories. The only obvious identifiers I know are assistance dogs' vests - and that we're not supposed to pet working dogs (unless owner says it's okay. I had a coworker who often let people pet her assistance dog. She was pretty loose with that rule - she'd had her dog for a long time and her dog still obeyed her well.)
Moreso on social media, not necessary to have an account to see some of it. FB, twitter, instagram are ones I've seen. I image there's stuff on tiktok on others too.
 
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Moreso on social media, not necessary to have an account to see some of it. FB, twitter, instagram are ones I've seen. I image there's stuff on tiktok on others too.
So, a fairly recent thing?

I'm not on any of those social media sites. Maybe that's why.
 

ChemGal

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So, a fairly recent thing?

I'm not on any of those social media sites. Maybe that's why.
Years for sure, I knew it before my nephews were born. I think close to a decade I've seen posts about it, FB was the first for me.

ETA according to this, it started in Australia in 2000
 
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