Composting human bodies

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Mendalla

Metalhead ape rockin' out
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It is now legal in California. The RCs are bitching, but I am think their argument is bunk. "Treats human bodies as a disposable commodity"? Really? This is just an an enhanced version of what actually happens to a body naturally, i.e. decay leads to it becoming compost. If we really wanted to treat humans with dignity, we'd be burying untreated bodies and letting nature take its course, not burning or embalming them. It's how we should be handling them, in other words. And why should the RCs get to dictate what someone like me chooses for our final sendoff? If I want my body to be composted, that should be my choice under my faith. Once again, the RC bishops seem to forget that their church is no longer the final authority on these things.

 

Carolla

wondering & wandering
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The idea of "human composting" was in a podcast I listened to last week - an interview with a 4th generation funeral director. It was the first I had heard of it. It takes about a month of careful tending & yields approx 1 cubic yard (!) of compost (including ground bone). People would have the choice to have the compost returned to them or it could be spread in a designated 'naturalized' area/forest - because 1 cubic yard is A LOT!!

Burial of the dead has not been a practice forever. And he did comment in the podcast that space in cemetaries is NOT a problem. He also commented on "green cemetaries", use of shrouds rather than caskets & coffins, mushroom suits (?!), embalming practices and other methods of disposal/dispersal of human remains.

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust? Return to creation ... not sure what the RC bishops might be on about. But it's not new that there is a push from them to control the behaviours of others.
 

ninj

She/Her/They
Embalming fluids contaminate groundwater. Composting our mortal coil is a very sensible idea. I am incredulous anyway that people still listen to BS from the medieval RC church.
 
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Nancy

Well-Known Member
This reminds me of what I saw on the news yesterday...the digging up of the Ukrainian bodies who had been 'dumped' without ceremony by the Russian invaders. The news commentator said that the worst and most degrading thing for a human was to be buried in an unmarked grave. It made me think about what is truly degrading: Isn't the human body meant to be a disposable commodity? And what happened to those Ukranian people in life at the end was surely the most degrading and barbaric thing.

I've been wondering what to tell my children about what to do with my body once I am gone. I thought maybe cremation and buried with the rest of my family. I won't need a head stone. But this composting thing is a possibility to. I'll have to look into it.
 

Mendalla

Metalhead ape rockin' out
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I think the worst would be ignoring the corpses - stepping past & not even burying them.
In a worst case scenario like a nuclear war, that's exactly what would probably be happening, though. Mass death would eventually reach a point where we couldn't keep up anymore.
 

jimkenney12

Well-Known Member
I first heard about this a few years ago. I believe it is already legal in Washington or Oregon. For wanderers like us, one challenge would be having a funeral home ready to do this. Also, I signed the declaration that whatever parts of my body are not used in organ transplants can be used for research.

But I do like the idea.
 
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