Christianity and Climate change

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Waterfall

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Of course it's not made to last forever, waterfall. In a few billion years, earth will be no more, but I believe there's probably 'life' elsewhere in the Universe.
Or if we believe that ALL of Creation comprises Godde... Then when I wound Creation, I wound Godde.

Politically, if you use this model of Godde to elevate the health of soil, air, water, flora, fauna to the rank of Citizen, you have a model that must be sustainable or it fails itself.
Probably many Christians don't believe God IS creation(I'm one of them), rather I believe creation points to God, but yes if that is the way you see God, so be it. Anyway, we are probably going in the same direction, as we supposedly are appointed the caretakers of this planet.
I tend to believe God will exist even if all creation ceased to exist. Who knows maybe it's happened before.
 

BetteTheRed

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Probably many Christians don't believe God IS creation(I'm one of them), rather I believe creation points to God, but yes if that is the way you see God, so be it.
I think I'm making a point, waterfall, that UNLESS you see all of Creation as somehow completely sacred, i.e. "God", then you have little tendency towards an ecologically-focussed spirituality, and ergo, little theological reason to act as advocate for Creation.
 

Mendalla

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I think I'm making a point, waterfall, that UNLESS you see all of Creation as somehow completely sacred, i.e. "God", then you have little tendency towards an ecologically-focussed spirituality, and ergo, little theological reason to act as advocate for Creation.
Not sure I completely agree, though maybe I am misunderstanding. I think @jimkenney12 reflects much the same ideas and values without believing that nature = God. See quote below, esp. bolded part. God's work cannot be God. So I don't think pantheism is a logical necessity to have a "green theology", even if it helps. Panentheism or even a traditional monotheism that values God's creative work is enough.

If we believe that all creation is sacred as the work of God, and can agree that climate change, by happening as fast as it is threatens most living things, and can accept that we are one factor in the rate of climate change, then we are called to pray as best as we can for guidance in responding to our role in climate change and actively acting to deepen our understanding of the dynamics of climate change, changing our own behaviour, and advocating in the public sphere for actions to slow down the rate of climate change and providing financial and other support to those most harmed by climate change.
 
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Mendalla

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Why can’t God’s work be God? What about Jesus? The all in all?
Because it makes no sense to say someone's work is the same as the someone. I write stories. Are my stories me?

I am not arguing against pantheism or that nature can't be God. In fact, I describe as pantheist at times. What I am saying is that in pantheism, existence becomes essentially self-creating and is no longer "creation" or "created" in the classical sense. Many panentheist schools of thought are similar.
 

Ritafee

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Luce NDs

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God is beyond human comprehension ... so the mortal dark games can be played out under distant lights ...
 

unsafe

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John MacArthur: The Bible on Global Warming

This is a 1 and a half minute video -----

 

GeoFee

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“God is in control of everything on the earth?”

Is it God who starves millions of children around the world?
 

BetteTheRed

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And in an odd way, that preacher is half correct. Humanity will not destroy the planet. Humanity will do so much damage to Earth that Homo Sapiens will be another casualty in the Sixth Great Extinction.

There may even still be harvesting and tilling going on, but it may be octopuses doing it.
 

ninjafaery

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And in an odd way, that preacher is half correct. Humanity will not destroy the planet. Humanity will do so much damage to Earth that Homo Sapiens will be another casualty in the Sixth Great Extinction.

There may even still be harvesting and tilling going on, but it may be octopuses doing it.
Agree...also there's an octopus who correctly predicted Trump's win, so you just could be right.
 

BetteTheRed

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Agree...also there's an octopus who correctly predicted Trump's win, so you just could be right.
I seriously don't eat octopus because there's something karmically wyrd about eating something that might be smarter than you.
 

Mendalla

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tentacles with suction cups
Best part :giggle:

(actually, cuttlefish or the bodies of small squid are better eating than most cephalopod tentatcles).

There may even still be harvesting and tilling going on, but it may be octopuses doing it.
If there is another dominant, sapient species, I doubt it will come from sea life as we know it. At some point, they will likely have to become amphibious. Not being able to function on land is too limiting.

Personally, though, given the current state of our knowledge of Fermi's Paradox, I suspect we are a one shot deal. It took the Earth over 3 billion years to produce sapient, self-aware species capable of tool-use and developing a sophisticated understanding of existence and all the ones we know of are from our genus (sorry, we don't have evidence of cephalopods having human-level self-awareness and reasoning ability as of yet). The odds of it happening again are looking pretty low given that we have no evidence of similar species anywhere else in the universe. If technological civilizations are commonplace, we would likely know by now. So tech-using species are either very rare to develop or tend to self-annihilate after a certain point in technological development. And, honestly, "both" might be the answer, meaning once a species blows itself to kingdom come, that planet never develops another one of that capability. Yes, it is a rather bleak view of existence, but all the more reason for us to get our act together.
 

Luce NDs

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And in an odd way, that preacher is half correct. Humanity will not destroy the planet. Humanity will do so much damage to Earth that Homo Sapiens will be another casualty in the Sixth Great Extinction.

There may even still be harvesting and tilling going on, but it may be octopuses doing it.
God needed assistance ... being a non interventionist ... thus demos and the leaders ...
 

Luce NDs

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And in an odd way, that preacher is half correct. Humanity will not destroy the planet. Humanity will do so much damage to Earth that Homo Sapiens will be another casualty in the Sixth Great Extinction.

There may even still be harvesting and tilling going on, but it may be octopuses doing it.
These may appear as ganglion ...
 
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