• There will be a short downtime at 8am EDT on Sunday, July 21 so the admins can update Xenforo to the latest maintenance release. Based on the last one and testing in our dev, this should only take 10-15 min. at most, probably less.
  • A member of the original wondercafe, Punkins has passed away. There's a thread in the In Memoriam section

Unspeakable

Lastpointe

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I didn’t watch it but was working as an RN though the 70-90’s. A scary and confusing time for hospitals. Uncertainly about what was safe, what wasn’t, how AIDS was transmitted, how safe was blood........

As to premies and blood. In my experience most premies who were under 30 weeks likely received blood. Would say all babies under 28 weeks did, unless they were amazingly healthy. No , parents wouldn’t have been told or asked. Blood transfusions are a normal part of medical care. A premie would have blood work monitored frequently depending on their overall health. And occasionally that blood would be replaced. Usually in amounts of 10 to 15 cc’s About a third to a half of an ounce

With Jehovah Witness babies it wasn’t , unless their condition was life threatening Once our unit went to court once that I recall but usually one parent was less invested in the rules and gave permission

Hospitals would have records but if you have concerns I would get tested. Though, now, 40 years later I would think symptoms should dictate what yo should do
 

Luce NDs

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Sidney Sheldon once wrote some myth on bloodlines and how powerful people preferred to shed other's blood ... common knowledge is based on the blood-brain separation ... something to store in mined ... augre?

The Hei do dispise looking into mutch ...
 

Ritafee

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A controversial startup that charges $8,000 to fill your veins with young blood now claims to be up and running in 5 cities across the US

But because the Food and Drug Administration has approved blood transfusions, Ambrosia's approach has been able to continue as an off-label treatment.

There appears to be significant interest. A week after putting up its first website in September, the company received roughly 100 inquiries about how to get the treatment, David Cavalier, Ambrosia's chief operating officer at the time, told Business Insider in the fall. That led to the creation of a waiting list, Cavalier said.
  • A startup called Ambrosia that charges $8,000 to fill your veins with the blood of young people is now accepting PayPal payments for the procedure online.
  • Jesse Karmazin, a Stanford graduate who founded Ambrosia, told Business Insider this week that the company was up and running in five US cities.
  • Ambrosia recently completed its first clinical trial designed to assess the benefits of the procedure, but it has yet to publish the results. Karmazin previously told Business Insider the company wanted to open the first clinic in New York City, but that didn't happen.
To Jesse Karmazin, a startup founder and Stanford Medical School graduate, blood is the next big government-approved drug.

Roughly three years ago, Karmazin launched Ambrosia, a startup that fills the veins of older people with blood from younger donors, hoping the procedure would help conquer aging by rejuvenating the body's organs. As Business Insider previously reported, there's little to no evidence to suggest this would work.

Read more: A controversial startup that charges $8,000 to fill patients' veins with young blood is opening a clinic in NYC — but researchers whose work inspired it warn that it's dangerous

The company is now up and running, Karmazin told Business Insider on Wednesday. Ambrosia recently revamped its website with a list of clinic locations and is now accepting payments for the procedure via PayPal. Two options are listed: 1 liter of young blood for $8,000, or 2 liters for $12,000.
 

Luce NDs

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What is that story about the greatest salesman selling a robe ... possibly a cover for something else again?
 
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