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The Revelation to John

Jae

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Jesus had given the early Church prophecy, by which missionaries were able to predict future events.

The prophecy of the Bible's book belongs to that form of predicting the future which is known as apocalypsis. In which the future is shown to the seer in visions. Thus we have here a history of the Church's fortunes from the first century to time's end.

John was shown how the Church would win conflicts. The book's author received the revelation from Jesus and embodied it in this book. He was then an exile on Patmos in the Aegean Sea, off Asia Minor, having been banished there for his faith.

It was on a Sunday that John was given these visions, his mind, through God's effect, being in a detached state, making it possible for him to visit places in spirit while his body was on Patmos.

The exile of John occurred during the time Domitian was Emperor of Rome, and Revelation was written to Asia Minor's seven churches, in the first centuries' 90's.

It serves for consolation to God's children in the trials which are the missionaries' lot until time's end. The prophecy of the triumph of God's kingdom, the promise of Christ's coming, heaven's pictures, have cheered millions of missionaries.

A brief outline... After the introduction we may distinguish seven visions. The first shows us Christ as his Church's Ruler. In the second he is the universe's King. In the third, he is his Church's High Priest. In the fourth he is fighter against the dragon, the world and the Antichrist. In the fifth God is Judge. In the sixth Jesus is the dragon blaster. The seventh vision paints a picture of the perfection of God's Kingdom in the new Jerusalem. The book ends with the cry: “Even so, come, Lord, Jesus!”
 

Jae

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Thoughts on Revelation 1:1-3...

John claims for his book divine authorship: Jesus' apocalypse, which God gave him, to show his missionaries what'll happen; and he sent it through his angel to his missionary John. Jesus here revealed the future. He had been told it by God and acted as a prophet in making God's will known.

This message was directed to God's missionaries, and its contents consisted in the relation of events which were bound to happen according to God's will.

Jesus sent his message through an angel. He revealed it to John in visions. In this manner the message was to be brought to others: Who bore witness of God's Word, and of Jesus' testimony, what he saw.

John was the means in spreading the message. His testimony's content was God's Word, the Word which came from God and spoke of God, and Jesus' witness.

In this book John embodied those Gospel truths which he saw. He says, "Blessed's he that reads and they that hear the prophecy and hold to that which's written in it; for the time's near."

Not all the missionaries of those days were able to read, since many of them were slaves. So both he that read this message to others and they that listened to, and heeded, it are called blessed.

For it isn't enough to read and hear the prophecy, God's Word's instruction in salvation. It requires a keeping, an observing, a relying upon its promises in faith.

This attitude is still required since the time's near, we're living in the world's last hour. This is no time for sleeping. Vigilance must characterize the missionaries in distress' last days.
 

Jae

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Thoughts on Revelation 1:4-8...

The greeting's beautiful, 'John to the seven Asian churches: Grace to you and peace from God, and from the seven Spirits that are before God's throne, and from Jesus.'

John's addressing the seven churches in Asia, the seven stations where God's Word had taken hold, churches whose conditions let us picture the circumstances of Jesus' Church until time's end.

The greeting comprises the Gospel's summary: grace, the love which the shameful have in redemption: peace, which follows the shameful person's reconciliation with God. This is God's blessing.

When Jesus comes for his own's redemption, to sit in judgment upon his enemies, he'll reveal himself as God.

The blessings are also from the seven Spirits before grace's throne, from the Spirit.

The blessings are transmitted through Jesus, a faithful Witness to the Gospel. He conquered death and rose as the First-born from the dead. And now that he's exalted to God's right hand, he's the Prince, Lord and King.

To this Jesus John now addresses a doxology. The love which Jesus had in his heart for his elect's been proven: he loosed them from their shame at his life's cost, by giving his blood as a ransom for them.

Thereby he has brought them into a relationship with him. He has constituted them his kingdom. Their enemies are conquered before them, and they're heaven's heirs. For this they give glory to him alone; that's their sacrifice.

The missionary now takes up the thought which was interrupted by the doxology, 'He's coming on the clouds, and all will see him, even those that pierced him, and the earth will howl over him.'

The missionary's here carried forward to Judgment Day. Jesus will appear. All the earth's people will see him returning as their Judge.

All that the shameful can do and will do on that day will be to weep because of him, gibbering in terror in anticipation of the fate which they see before them. That's the truth.

Now Jesus is introduced as speaking, "I'm Alpha and Omega, says God, God that is, was and's coming, the Almighty." Alpha and Omega, are names of the beginning and the end, and are used of Jesus and by Jesus who's true God with God from eternity.

Like God, Jesus is from everlasting to everlasting, and he's God. No enemy's too mighty for him, not even Satan's hosts; all's placed under him. That's the missionaries' comfort, the foundation upon which their faith rests.
 

Jae

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Thoughts on Revelation 1:9-11...

For the third time John mentions his name, "I, John, your brother in the tribulation and in the kingdom and in the patience in Jesus, found myself on Patmos on account of God's Word and Jesus' testimony."

John knows nothing of aspirations: he doesn't mention his office. It's with satisfaction that he calls himself the missionaries' brother.

John and all missionaries partake in Jesus' kingdom, at once the miserable and the blessed. So they share also in Jesus' patience, for tribulation works patience. Thus they're enabled to persevere, to be steadfast in the midst of misery, distress and afflictions.

It wasn't as a criminal that John was suffering the punishment of crime. He was on Patmos for the sake of God's Word: because of his testimony of Jesus, whom he confessed. It was a martyrdom which John suffered in his exile.

John now describes how he first received Jesus' revelation, 'I found myself in the spirit on Sunday, and I heard behind me a trumpet, 'Write what you see, and send it to the seven churches.'' This revelation was given to John, while he doing his Sunday devotions.

The book makes the impression that it belongs to Sunday; there's something of a holiday, something festive about it. John found himself in the spirit, in that ecstasy which detached the mind from the body, as it attended revelation.

While he was in this state, it seemed to him that a trumpet's sound came from behind him, the voice in the sound commissioning him to put the description of the visions which he'd see down on paper and send the book to Asia's seven churches.

Ephesus was this district's city, in Lydia. Smyrna was 40 miles north of Ephesus. Pergamos was 60 miles northeast of Smyrna. Thyatira was a city in Lydia. Sardis was 30 miles south of Thyatira. Philadelphia was 25 miles southeast of Sardis. Laodicea was 50 miles from Philadelphia.

☆The names' order's that of a circuit, such as one would make in starting from Ephesus and traveling clockwise.☆
 

Jae

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Thoughts on Revelation 1:12-16...

John records what impression the voice made upon him. Compelled by the power from above, John turned around to see whose was the voice that spoke to him. The expression's given in an odd form, to concentrate the attention upon the voice, Jesus' word.

John describes what he saw, "And having turned around, I saw lamp-stands, and in the lamp-stands' midst one similar to Jesus clothed in a robe and girded across his breast with a belt."

The prophet saw lampstands. The Jewish Church's time was past, and so its symbol was no longer in use. Lamps, symbolizing churches, are spoken of, since the Church's reflected in them.

In the lampstands' midst was Jesus. The churches are inseparable from Jesus, who lives and moves among his temple's cressets with a high priest's dignity.

This is marked by the robe reaching to the feet, which was honour's mark in Asia, as well as by the girdle about the breast, which showed the garment to the best advantage and added to the wearer's prestige.

☆ Jesus is described as being similar to a man. With his human nature is combined his Godhead's majesty, which elevates him far above a human being. ☆

He's both High Priest and King.

The description continues, "His head and hair were wool, and his eyes were a fire's flame, and his feet were bronze glowing in a furnace, and his voice was waters' voice."

Just as in the OT prophecy God's pictured with white hair, so Jesus here, by the same token, is shown to be God.

The eyes flaming fire signify the combination of zeal and of omniscience in one whose essence abhors shame and impurity.

The word which's translated “brass” designates a metals' alloy which was our bronze. His feet were this metal as it glowed and melted in the furnace's heat.

Where He goes, he spreads terror in the ways of those that have rejected him; he's a fire to the shameful.

His voice was waters' rushing, which threatens the Church's enemies and hinders them in their designs against God's saints.

The apostle writes, "And holding stars, and a sword projecting out of his mouth, and his appearance as the sun shines in his strength. The stars are the churches' pastors. These he holds, to show that they're his, that he holds them by his power.

The sword going forth from Jesus' mouth's his Word, his mouth's breath, powerful to overcome the godless and adversaries.

His appearance, the impression which John received from the vision, was that of a form surrounded with sunlight's rays, emanating a splendor greater than that of the sun at midday, penetrating through fog and clouds.

The shameful shrink, shrivel and wither before his gaze's power.
 

Luce NDs

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A common man as Jahn in the desert would learn of the exclusiveness of power a sean to behold as apocalyptic stroke of cognizance of gnome*tics in arid space ... purely something in psyche realms ... often unthought of by the mindless ... no soul as Satchmo would declare ... abstract blues?

Does instill a sense of chasm and separation ... bridge over disturbed waters? Eris in late E in the dipper ... wry Uri ... greater waters and lesser ... Medusa's revenge ... unrequited love for what was revealed from the psyche pool? Where reason and irrational rants collide ... means!

Tis paradigmatic ... dark bumps ...
 
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Jae

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Thoughts on Revelation 1:17-20...

The vision's effect upon John, "And when I saw him, I fell at his feet dead, and he laid his hand upon me, saying, 'Fear not. I'm the First and the Last and the One; and I was dead, and, lo. I'm alive forever and ever, and have hell's keys."

There's comfort in Jesus' appearance in this vision, since it's impossible for his foes to stand in his sight. For that reason Jesus laid his hand upon John with consolation. The “Fear not” was to calm his heart and to fill him with trust.

What's true of God's true also of Jesus. They that trust in him will live; and they that live in him won't ever die.

Jesus' cry on the cross, with which he commended his spirit into God's hands, was victory's cry. By his victory over hell Jesus is the One from eternity to eternity, also according to his human nature.

And he has hell's keys, power to save and to condemn. Those who are given faith will receive at his hands life with all the bliss that this implies; those who he passes over will receive death's sentence.

Power's in Jesus. With authority, he says, "Write what you saw, and what is and what's going to happen after this, the stars' mystery which thou saw on my hand, and the lampstands." The visions John was to write in a book.

Jesus wanted to explain to John what He meant by the stars, and by the lampstands; He had a message for His missionaries at that time and for subsequent ages.

He explains, "The stars are the churches' pastors, and the lampstands are the churches. The pastors are called stars on account of their sharing the heavenly doctrine. The churches are lampstands, through the Gospel, their light."

This light should shine forth from missionaries as well as from the churches, both in missional confession and conduct, these two being the glory of the Church on earth.