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Northwind

Still knitting. Walking the path to health.
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If you do, go for a drive, note down the names of clinics you pass and then you can look them up and call (or drop in and ask at reception if you feel like it right then).

I've asked a couple places about the clinic. They are places that might know if anyone does. I may stop in to a couple of clinics. It won't be today or in the next few days. In fact, I'll likely wait until after I've seen the surgeon. The woman at the Family Practice division agreed this might be a good approach. She said specialists are well connected and have good relationships with the family docs.
 

Northwind

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Does your sis have a GP? If so - any possibility of her requesting them to accept you as a family member? Sometimes that happens here.
My sister's GP is close to an hour away from here. That's too far. Plus that doctor would not be connected to services in Nanaimo. The walk-in clinic I used initially is good and I am comfortable returning there. That is one thing I'm thankful for right now. This city does at least have walk-in clinics. When I was up north there was no access to medical care. Things would be worse for me there and I'm appreciative of that.
 

Northwind

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Some of you know that I asked on FB if anyone knew how to get a family physician in BC. I've had some good suggestions. I've also had support from the Division of Family Physicians to ask my surgeon. The woman there said the specialists have good relationships with family docs and can often help. I have a friend who is a physician. He used to work up north and now does locum work. Apparently he "knows" people and is working on it. That is nice to know. I don't want to take advantage of his position. I do appreciate his help though.

I feel more encouraged tonight. There's no rush right now. I do know though, it isn't easy so I have to work on it.
 

Luce NDs

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Work is hard and it must be done as painful addition ...

Some avoid it through elite positions where work of the Deis if often forgotten because of emotional over runs! Imagine horses in a Roman circle ... may give people on the ground tics, twitches and dashes for cover when the rush gets going ... so the story goes on! Sometimes the understanding is a great Job meant to keep the children of heaven occupied ... some don't grasp the cognizance!
 

Tabitha

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I am feeling grateful for the medical care here.I have a family physician who is good, and sees both me and my youngest. There is a walk-in that I go to when I need a quick appointment if my Dr. is not available. My son has a psychiatrist, a mental health worker, and a job support worker.

We got our family dr. when the walk-in told me that they knew a dr. taking new patients and to call right away-maybe 4 months after we moved here.
Here's hoping you get a regular dr. for both you and Mr. Northwind soon.
 

Mrs.Anteater

Even winter will come to an end
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Night frost is starting to turn the leaves, day time has still had up to 28degrees- mabe because of the storm that was passing us out on the ocean.
Working on the fence, stabilizing four posts which were loosened by the hurricane with concrete. Back to work on Monday. I think I would be ready to retire, sure would know enough to do, but I didn’t win Lotto Max, so I have to wait quite a few years more.
The garlic festival was a very busy event, with crafts and food and music. Missed the garlic eating contest and all garlic had sold out by the time we got there.
 

KayTheCurler

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Thinking about this situation that Northwind finds herself in has me shaking my head. It makes no sense for someone to be heavily involved in treatment for a while and then left without a contact person going into the future. I'd be tempted to ask the 'head' of the cancer team for advice. I know I would feel insecure without a general doctor I can trust.
 

Northwind

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I know I would feel insecure without a general doctor I can trust.
I realized that the reason I was so discouraged by the idea of not finding a doctor was this. I currently have amazing doctors. I'm going to ask the surgeon if he can recommend anyone. I will also ask the oncologist. She's in Victoria, so might not be able to help. I do also have a friend who is a physician who "knows people" and is working on it. I'm sure it will work out. I'm more concerned about making sure I can find someone by the new year.
 
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Went to 7-11 by my work. A homeless guy - he looked maybe indigenous, he had a glass eye, some sort of slight mobility disability, but he was polite and didn't seem noticeably high or drunk or anything. He had his hat out and held the door for me. I didn't have change on me. There was a lineup inside. He came in a couple of minutes later to get in line and the woman behind the counter said, "I'm not serving you! Get out!" The other cashier said he'll serve him. He wanted a hot-dog. The woman said, "No!" again, and the other cashier turned his head toward the man and said quietly, "I'll serve you over here in just a minute, Tommy." The woman said "We won't serve you. Go!" The man then said, "He said he'll serve me. I just want a hotdog." ...and the woman said, "He won't serve you either." ...then the male cashier said, "Sorry, man. She's my supervisor. I have to do what she says."

Frustrated, the man says, "There's no reason to do this. I'm not doing anything wrong. You're just being a b*tch!" (I would have to agree with him on all counts). He left the store.

I was next up at the male cashier's til. We both had sad faces. I got my bus tickets then asked him what Tommy usually gets on his hot-dog. He said he wasn't sure but there are packets of condiments over in the corner. I bought a hot-dog, grabbed some packets of mustard and ketchup, went outside, and Tommy was gone.

I crossed the street, walked about 10 yards, and a guy was walking toward me. He said hi. I said, "Hi. Aren't you the guy who just held the door open for me at 7-11? You wanted a hot-dog?" He said, "Yeah, she doesn't like me." I handed him the hot-dog. He was surprised and said "Thank you. God Bless you." ... "You too." I said, and went on my way.

It really, really bothered me. I imagine it bothered Tommy more. But that was blatant discrimination. There was no reason for it. That wouldn't have happened in Vancouver. I think I have mentioned before how much of a NIMBY town this is. It's pretty bad. I'm not even sure who to complain to and if they'll do anything.
 
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Mrs.Anteater

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Went to 7-11 by my work. A homeless guy - he looked maybe indigenous, he had a glass eye, some sort of slight mobility disability, but he was polite and didn't seem noticeably high or drunk or anything. He had his hat out and held the door for me. I didn't have change on me. There was a lineup inside. He came in a couple of minutes later to get in line and the woman behind the counter said, "I'm not serving you! Get out!" The other cashier said he'll serve him. He wanted a hot-dog. The woman said, "No!" again, and the other cashier turned his head toward the man and said quietly, "I'll serve you over here in just a minute, Tommy." The woman said "We won't serve you. Go!" The man then said, "He said he'll serve me. I just want a hotdog." ...and the woman said, "He won't serve you either." ...then the male cashier said, "Sorry, man. She's my supervisor. I have to do what she says."

Frustrated, the man says, "There's no reason to do this. I'm not doing anything wrong. You're just being a b*tch!" (I would have to agree with him on all counts). He left the store.

I was next up at the male cashier's til. We both had sad faces. I got my bus tickets then asked him what Tommy usually gets on his hot-dog. He said he wasn't sure but there are packets of condiments over in the corner. I bought a hot-dog, grabbed some packets of mustard and ketchup, went outside, and Tommy was gone.

I crossed the street, walked about 10 yards, and a guy was walking toward me. He said hi. I said, "Hi. Aren't you the guy who just held the door open for me at 7-11? You wanted a hot-dog?" He said, "Yeah, she doesn't like me." I handed him the hot-dog. He was surprised and said "Thank you. God Bless you." ... "You too." I said, and went on my way.

It really, really bothered me. I imagine it bothered Tommy more. But that was blatant discrimination. There was no reason for it. That wouldn't have happened in Vancouver. I think I have mentioned before how much of a NIMBY town this is. It's pretty bad. I'm not even sure who to complain to and if they'll do anything.
The store manager. Unless she WAS the manager. Might be worth a try.
 

Luce NDs

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Competitive, aggressive character seems to make a better impression in a world that works itself to death ... thus what isn't appearing (incarnate) must have left the site ... all that remains are hateful boners!

These can be utilized to make a skeleton of wings ... a flaming takeoff? Reinforces Nu Ton's Law on action/reaction ...

Moor hateful NU's for those that didn;t wish to know in the first place ... a spot to get beyond? ʘ ... may be seminal of the core value lost in the Ego position ... the Ego being poorly understood, or poly MS Understood! ↂ ... an old sign indicating 10,000 times in the dark ... where we are mostly every Dei!

Thus the Shadow is mostly regressive ... dark and mysterious!
 

Waterfall

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He may be legit Kimmio, and if he was, good for you.....unfortunately some of those who beg on the street are "professionals" and go home to a regular house. I'm like you, Id rather err than risk Im wrong and they do need help.
 
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He may be legit Kimmio, and if he was, good for you.....unfortunately some of those who beg on the street are "professionals" and go home to a regular house. I'm like you, Id rather err than risk Im wrong and they do need help.
Whoever he is, wherever he “really lives” (that didn’t cross my mind and wasn’t a factor...he was legitimately a street person - whether he stays somewhere to sleep I do not know but I have a 99.9% sense that he sleeps on the street or in a tent) he’s still allowed to go in and buy a hotdog.
 
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Northwind

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I struggle with this too. In my former town, many of our street people hung around the Dairy Queen. The town is small enough that most of us knew the people on the street, at least to recognize them. Many of us knew a few names and some of the circumstances that got them there. Many of them were Indigenous and had been essentially banned from their home communities. Most were usually harmless, mostly because their long history of drinking had aged them and made them physically unwell. They were generally more at risk from us rather than to us.

I was in DQ one time when one of these men asked for a coffee as any customer would, and he had the money to pay. The woman refused to let him buy a coffee. That bothered me. I honestly don't remember what happened next because the refusal of service stood out.

I do understand that businesses like this DQ have had problems with some of these people. They have seen them drunk and acting in disruptive ways. There are legitimate times where the business has had to ask them to leave. Still, there are times when they need to be recognized and treated as regular customers.
 

Luce NDs

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Always recall that some thoughts will be repulsive to a number of people ... especially if they are mindlessly pondering the wasteland of the hart ...
 

KayTheCurler

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Discrimination is plain wrong. It happens a lot in my community - usually against people who look indigenous. As a parent is was really hard watching one son being treated civilly and another son being treated rudely. They are both of indigenous descent but only one has 'the look'. Actually he is VERY good looking. He says he is followed when he shops in the city but we and our other kids aren't.

One thing does seem to have improved somewhat - the reaction to those with long term mental illness. They still can't find employment but do socialize without problems now. Thirty years ago they weren't welcome to go for lunch or coffee - now they are greeted by name. Several people with development delay or atypical neurology have part time jobs in stores and hotels which is good.

Don't get me started on the way some people refer to the new immigrants! Mostly it is driven by skin colour as the European immigrants aren't treated badly.
 

ChemGal

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It really, really bothered me. I imagine it bothered Tommy more. But that was blatant discrimination. There was no reason for it. That wouldn't have happened in Vancouver. I think I have mentioned before how much of a NIMBY town this is. It's pretty bad. I'm not even sure who to complain to and if they'll do anything.
It's hard to say if it's blatant discrimination or not.
He may be banned from the store for very good reasons, I know some areas will do that here.
 

ChemGal

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Whoever he is, wherever he “really lives” (that didn’t cross my mind and wasn’t a factor...he was legitimately a street person - whether he stays somewhere to sleep I do not know but I have a 99.9% sense that he sleeps on the street or in a tent) he’s still allowed to go in and buy a hotdog.
Again, there could be a legitimate reason for him NOT being allowed to.
 
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