Living in Canada as a foreigner

Pinga

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I saw you mentioned the Human Rights Museum. A wondercafe person was involved in that in some way - Anyone remember their name?
 

Luce NDs

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Are there human lefts ... or is that too futuristic to deal with remnants as tiny objects ... not satisfactory to centered subjects of narcussic trends ...

Thus the sting of B'z that go for the middle ...
 

GiancarloZ

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I saw you mentioned the Human Rights Museum. A wondercafe person was involved in that in some way - Anyone remember their name?
I still haven't gone inside, but the architecture is amazing.
 

GiancarloZ

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There's (are?) someone here from Calgary, I think.
I have been watching videos and learning about Calgary lately.
It looks like a very interesting city, with a better weather than Winnipeg and a big city feeling.
Is it true or just my impression?
My wife and I are planning to visit there to get a feeling of the city and maybe move there in the future.
What are your thoughts?
 

ChemGal

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There's (are?) someone here from Calgary, I think.
I have been watching videos and learning about Calgary lately.
It looks like a very interesting city, with a better weather than Winnipeg and a big city feeling.
Is it true or just my impression?
My wife and I are planning to visit there to get a feeling of the city and maybe move there in the future.
What are your thoughts?
I'm not there anymore, but was born there and lived there more than 1/2 my life.
It's more modernized and Americanized. Definitely a different vibe than Winnipeg. In the winter, if you're downtown the +15 system can be a nice way to get around and get exercise without requiring boots. I was always in the suburbs though.
The weather is fickle. Chinooks will warm it up in the winter although they also get cold snaps. 'Freak' snow storms in the winter happen about every other year.
Demographics are much younger, lots of people move there during boom times. It's probably a little easier as a newcomer as neighbours became like family.
 

Carolla

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My friend's dtr lives & works in Calgary for several years & loves it. Yes - weather is quite variable! If you enjoy the outdoors, it is a great place to live - close to the mountains, good bike trails, lots of hiking & outdoor sports, camping etc. available. Excellent health care system. Ample social scene & cultural events. The airport is a fairly major hub - so that makes it simpler to fly to many places (compared to Winnipeg). At one time housing was hard to find & expensive, but I think that may have eased in recent years.
 
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I’d bet you’d like Vancouver or Victoria. (Yes it rains quite a bit...we get a bit more sun in Victoria, and summers can be quite dry - rain keeps everything very green). Vancouver is very diverse, has everything...summer and winter outdoor activities, very urban, yet with nature within the metro area. The drawbacks are, housing: it’s expensive and vacancies are low. Victoria has almost everything but not quite the urban feel to it. It’s less diverse, with middle class sensibilities. It does have some nice little artisan style villages and a downtown area that looks very British which tourists find attractive, beautiful ocean views and beaches all around the city, and a park with peacocks roaming free. It is also almost as difficult housing-wise. And the population skews older...lots of people retire here. But, there are also lots of young families.

If you could get into, and afford shares in, decent co-op housing, I’m sure you would make fast friends with your neighbours - in whatever location you chose. People tend to love co-op living, when they get in, and they stay in the same buildings for many years - singles, couples, families and retirees.

About CHF BC - CHF BC
 
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BetteTheRed

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Yes, I'm very appreciative of Giancarloz sharing his new experiences with us. I read with interest, as my parents were first generation immigrants (I was born here, but they'd only been here a year or two), and my mother was very homesick, and often went 'home' to visit. And her family were always over here.

What sort of family interactions will you be able to have over the holidays? That will certainly be a time for homesickness.
 

Mendalla

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I think Mrs. M's roughest period since she first came was this year. Having your parents dying on the other side of the planet is very hard. Though she did get home to see her father one last time and was there when he passed, her mother wasn't expected and she only just made it for the funeral.

Holidays are a bit of an issue, since the Chinese keep very different ones from us. Their Winter Solstice festival isn't that big, with the major holidays being Lunar New Year later in January or in February and the Moon Festival in early Fall, usually September. However, there are more and more observances of their holidays happening here so at least she isn't totally cut off from her culture.
 

paradox3

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I read with interest, as my parents were first generation immigrants (I was born here, but they'd only been here a year or two), and my mother was very homesick, and often went 'home' to visit. And her family were always over here.
My parents were both born in Toronto. But my grandmothers (one from England, one from Ireland) had similar experiences with homesickness. My English grandmother went "home" to visit several times that I can remember. And she had one relative in particular who came to Canada for a couple of holidays.
 

Luce NDs

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All my ancestors were born in the woods ... thus Black Forester shadows ... Nymphs?

Pseudo .... or otherwise about the stix! Consider the folk tales about men caught in logjambs!

Miramichi folklore ...
 

Pinga

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@GiancarloZ & others

Do you experience this item re elevators?
2. Awkward social interactions. It is a consumerist society - less than the US, but much more than Brazil (also due to the better financial conditions), so it's increasingly individualized and lonely. Social interactions are usually very limited to the context in which they occur and it seems difficult to extrapolate them into the personal field and create friendships. Interactions with strangers on the streets are even more awkward, and many people do not know how to navigate simple things as waiting for others to get out of the elevator before getting in

I know that I didn't in Toronto, where it was really clear that you were to wait. If you didn't, coz you were deep in thought, (it happens) or missed them (it happens), there was generally some form of exchange.

Curious if it is different by area, by what people are up to (business vs residential), or some other factor.

 

ChemGal

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@GiancarloZ & others

Do you experience this item re elevators?
2. Awkward social interactions. It is a consumerist society - less than the US, but much more than Brazil (also due to the better financial conditions), so it's increasingly individualized and lonely. Social interactions are usually very limited to the context in which they occur and it seems difficult to extrapolate them into the personal field and create friendships. Interactions with strangers on the streets are even more awkward, and many people do not know how to navigate simple things as waiting for others to get out of the elevator before getting in

I know that I didn't in Toronto, where it was really clear that you were to wait. If you didn't, coz you were deep in thought, (it happens) or missed them (it happens), there was generally some form of exchange.

Curious if it is different by area, by what people are up to (business vs residential), or some other factor.

I was taught at a young age you do not stand directly in front of an elevator and you wait for people to get off first.
I don't see why this changes if it's residential, business, etc.
I have found myself at times preparing to step in only to realize someone was coming out - usually because it was a time/place that I was used to it being empty. I would apologize and step to the side.

I think this rule applies to public transit as well, although it does seem like quite a few people don't know/don't care.
 

Jae

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@GiancarloZ & others

Do you experience this item re elevators?
2. Awkward social interactions. It is a consumerist society - less than the US, but much more than Brazil (also due to the better financial conditions), so it's increasingly individualized and lonely. Social interactions are usually very limited to the context in which they occur and it seems difficult to extrapolate them into the personal field and create friendships. Interactions with strangers on the streets are even more awkward, and many people do not know how to navigate simple things as waiting for others to get out of the elevator before getting in

I know that I didn't in Toronto, where it was really clear that you were to wait. If you didn't, coz you were deep in thought, (it happens) or missed them (it happens), there was generally some form of exchange.

Curious if it is different by area, by what people are up to (business vs residential), or some other factor.

The only elevator I take on a regular basis here in Korea is the one at work. It goes only 5 floors up and down, with me going from G to 4, and 4 to G. I haven't been on it with anyone I don't know yet, so there haven't been any awkward times.

Interactions with others on the streets are something I rarely if ever have. People are unlikely to try to strike up a conversation with me nor I with them because of the perceived language difference. A few times someone has said, "hello" to me in Korean. Some people here seem genuinely fascinated by my presence in Seosan. They almost stare at me, a white guy, as I walk by. I imagine that would happen less in Seoul or even Suwon which are both more multicultiral.
 

Mrs.Anteater

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When we decided to move to Canada and my parents had concerns about not seeing me for a long time, I was so naive to say, no problem, I would be coming every year. Thankfully, my mother was still healthy enough to come to visit us for three weeks every year for the first seven years, because at first, we didn’t have paid vacation or enough seniority to take two weeks off at a time and secondly we didn’t have enough money, either. So, it was three years until I could make it back for the first time, and this was supported financially by my mother. Thankfully, by the time my mother could no longer come, I had a permanent position and four weeks vacation. Now I make a point to go back every year as long as my mom is alive.
 

GiancarloZ

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I'm not there anymore, but was born there and lived there more than 1/2 my life.
It's more modernized and Americanized. Definitely a different vibe than Winnipeg. In the winter, if you're downtown the +15 system can be a nice way to get around and get exercise without requiring boots. I was always in the suburbs though.
The weather is fickle. Chinooks will warm it up in the winter although they also get cold snaps. 'Freak' snow storms in the winter happen about every other year.
Demographics are much younger, lots of people move there during boom times. It's probably a little easier as a newcomer as neighbours became like family.
It sounds very exciting. I have been craving for a big city feeling. I generally like Winnipeg, except for the extreme cold and the gray days, but it lacks a vibrant downtown, for example. In summer it's OK, but during winter I bet a vibrant city atmosphere can be cheering.

My friend's dtr lives & works in Calgary for several years & loves it. Yes - weather is quite variable! If you enjoy the outdoors, it is a great place to live - close to the mountains, good bike trails, lots of hiking & outdoor sports, camping etc. available. Excellent health care system. Ample social scene & cultural events. The airport is a fairly major hub - so that makes it simpler to fly to many places (compared to Winnipeg). At one time housing was hard to find & expensive, but I think that may have eased in recent years.
I have been looking at apartments for rent online and they are generally the same prices than Winnipeg. I might visit there soon, I have been receiving lots of positive reports.

I’d bet you’d like Vancouver or Victoria. (Yes it rains quite a bit...we get a bit more sun in Victoria, and summers can be quite dry - rain keeps everything very green). Vancouver is very diverse, has everything...summer and winter outdoor activities, very urban, yet with nature within the metro area. The drawbacks are, housing: it’s expensive and vacancies are low. Victoria has almost everything but not quite the urban feel to it. It’s less diverse, with middle class sensibilities. It does have some nice little artisan style villages and a downtown area that looks very British which tourists find attractive, beautiful ocean views and beaches all around the city, and a park with peacocks roaming free. It is also almost as difficult housing-wise. And the population skews older...lots of people retire here. But, there are also lots of young families.

If you could get into, and afford shares in, decent co-op housing, I’m sure you would make fast friends with your neighbours - in whatever location you chose. People tend to love co-op living, when they get in, and they stay in the same buildings for many years - singles, couples, families and retirees.

About CHF BC - CHF BC
I didn't know this modalidity of housing! Thanks for introducing it to me. In Brazil it would never work.
I think I'd love Vancouver or Victoria but my wife is very concerned with the prices and the rain/gray weather. Is it as bad as people say?
We might visit Vancouver and Victoria, anyway, and I expect my wife is then able to get over her impressions.

Yes, I'm very appreciative of Giancarloz sharing his new experiences with us. I read with interest, as my parents were first generation immigrants (I was born here, but they'd only been here a year or two), and my mother was very homesick, and often went 'home' to visit. And her family were always over here.

What sort of family interactions will you be able to have over the holidays? That will certainly be a time for homesickness.
Thanks @BetteTheRed !!
Well, my parents only will able to come here next year. So no family for holidays. I wish I could travel to Brazil for Christmas, but it can cost up to 3000 dollars. Not an option right now.
Fortunately, though, a friend from church who I really like invited us to her house for Christmas Eve. Otherwise it'd be the saddest Christmas ever.

I think Mrs. M's roughest period since she first came was this year. Having your parents dying on the other side of the planet is very hard. Though she did get home to see her father one last time and was there when he passed, her mother wasn't expected and she only just made it for the funeral.

Holidays are a bit of an issue, since the Chinese keep very different ones from us. Their Winter Solstice festival isn't that big, with the major holidays being Lunar New Year later in January or in February and the Moon Festival in early Fall, usually September. However, there are more and more observances of their holidays happening here so at least she isn't totally cut off from her culture.
I'm really sorry for her losses and I hope she can feel less homesick with the possibility of having traditional holidays here.

My parents were both born in Toronto. But my grandmothers (one from England, one from Ireland) had similar experiences with homesickness. My English grandmother went "home" to visit several times that I can remember. And she had one relative in particular who came to Canada for a couple of holidays.
I wanted to do the same right now. Luckily I have a Brazilian childhood friend here. It's a good tie to have around.

@GiancarloZ & others

Do you experience this item re elevators?
2. Awkward social interactions. It is a consumerist society - less than the US, but much more than Brazil (also due to the better financial conditions), so it's increasingly individualized and lonely. Social interactions are usually very limited to the context in which they occur and it seems difficult to extrapolate them into the personal field and create friendships. Interactions with strangers on the streets are even more awkward, and many people do not know how to navigate simple things as waiting for others to get out of the elevator before getting in

I know that I didn't in Toronto, where it was really clear that you were to wait. If you didn't, coz you were deep in thought, (it happens) or missed them (it happens), there was generally some form of exchange.

Curious if it is different by area, by what people are up to (business vs residential), or some other factor.

Maybe it's a Winnipeg thing, but I got ran over when leaving elevators a million times. It happens all the time in the building I live. I also get ran over a lot in places like Safeway or Shoppers Drug Mart. It feels like people are not space wise, or are too self absorbed.

When we decided to move to Canada and my parents had concerns about not seeing me for a long time, I was so naive to say, no problem, I would be coming every year. Thankfully, my mother was still healthy enough to come to visit us for three weeks every year for the first seven years, because at first, we didn’t have paid vacation or enough seniority to take two weeks off at a time and secondly we didn’t have enough money, either. So, it was three years until I could make it back for the first time, and this was supported financially by my mother. Thankfully, by the time my mother could no longer come, I had a permanent position and four weeks vacation. Now I make a point to go back every year as long as my mom is alive.
That was my mom's chief concern as well. They are coming next year but I still don't know when I'm able to go. That makes me feel very anxious.
 
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It sounds very exciting. I have been craving for a big city feeling. I generally like Winnipeg, except for the extreme cold and the gray days, but it lacks a vibrant downtown, for example. In summer it's OK, but during winter I bet a vibrant city atmosphere can be cheering.



I have been looking at apartments for rent online and they are generally the same prices than Winnipeg. I might visit there soon, I have been receiving lots of positive reports.


I didn't know this modalidity of housing! Thanks for introducing it to me. In Brazil it would never work.
I think I'd love Vancouver or Victoria but my wife is very concerned with the prices and the rain/gray weather. Is it as bad as people say?
We might visit Vancouver and Victoria, anyway, and I expect my wife is then able to get over her impressions.


Thanks @BetteTheRed !!
Well, my parents only will able to come here next year. So no family for holidays. I wish I could travel to Brazil for Christmas, but it can cost up to 3000 dollars. Not an option right now.
Fortunately, though, a friend from church who I really like invited us to her house for Christmas Eve. Otherwise it'd be the saddest Christmas ever.


I'm really sorry for her losses and I hope she can feel less homesick with the possibility of having traditional holidays here.


I wanted to do the same right now. Luckily I have a Brazilian childhood friend here. It's a good tie to have around.


Maybe it's a Winnipeg thing, but I got ran over when leaving elevators a million times. It happens all the time in the building I live. I also get ran over a lot in places like Safeway or Shoppers Drug Mart. It feels like people are not space wise, or are too self absorbed.


That was my mom's chief concern as well. They are coming next year but I still don't know when I'm able to go. That makes me feel very anxious.
Well, this week the forecast is about 50/50 rain and sun. Tomorrow should be mostly sunny, 7 degrees C. Here, on rainy days, the sun usually breaks through for a little while, but there are some dark, wet, rainy days occasionally...ask Bette. She was here during a particularly rainy week! I went shopping with her for a rainproof coat - but we had fun visiting. In Vancouver, when it rains, it pours! But when it is warm and sunny, it's beautiful. Even when it's cold and sunny it rarely dips below minus 2 on the south BC coast. That's cold here. It is very green - but even in the summer there are water restrictions due to long stretches without rain (not strict but people can't regularly water their yards). The last few years we have had hot dry summers.

Seattle, a sister US city nearby, is dubbed Emerald City, because it's so green.
 
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