Chalk painting furniture

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So wonder crafty people - anybody done any chalk painting of old furniture? I rather like the look of it & from what I can tell from youtube (repository of all knowledge!) it seems pretty straightforward. No big prep required, adheres well, easy to 'distress' if you wish, add a simple wax finish. I think I'd like to give it a try. Any tips you can offer?
 

Mendalla

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No painters in the Cafe?
No chalk painters, at least :D. For me, painting is a chore I do from time to time involving brushes, cans of coloured fluid, and walls. No chalk involved, I'm afraid.
 

Waterfall

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I've painted, just not chalk painting. I have seen some lovely examples in beach towns, many people seem to like it for their cottage.
 

BetteTheRed

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I totally rely on YouTube these days to get tips and tricks and learn new techniques. I learned how to make rotis, and tile a floor, completely through video.
 

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@BetteTheRed - kinda wonder sometimes how we lived without google and youtube! LOL I've been the video trail too. I also dropped by a shop in my neighbourhood where the woman paints lots of furniture - some I love, other bits not so much. But she's generous with information & gave me some tips.

What got me thinking about this was my recent stay at Five Oaks. There's lots of 'pre-loved' or 'experienced' furniture there :) Dining room table & chairs, sideboard, cabinets, dressers in the bedrooms etc. I was wondering about painting some of it to give a more pulled together look. Maybe I will try something of my own this weekend - see how it works out.

I've done tons of painting of walls, floors, cabinets etc - but usually with latex paint, not chalk paint. The fact that chalk paint requires minimal prep is appealing to me! Also it's often done with a bit of 'distressed' look - not perfectly smooth or pristine, so was thinking that might work well in a place that gets rented & subject to a bit harder wear perhaps than at home. Just usually a wax finish on it too - which is simple to apply. The best quality paint is expensive, but from what I can tell, a little goes a long way.
 

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It sure is Bette - way better made than a lot of new stuff!!
 
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I’m not a fan.
My niece does it. It looks good at the beginning, but does not stand up well, I don’t think. I think the wax gets dirt imbedded that never goes away. And slowly rubs off.

I do spray chalk paint made by general finishes. It could probably be applied with a brush and get decent results, but I would then coat it after with a flat, clear polyurethane to protect your work. I would stay away from wax. If you want a distressed look, you can sand off some edges of the milk paint prior to clear coat, or mix up some glaze to make it look older, but then finish with clear polyurethane. Then you can wipe it and clean it for years and it won’t keep getting grungier.
 
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